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books_and_literature:the_golden_bough [2017/02/14 04:18]
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books_and_literature:the_golden_bough [2017/02/14 05:08] (current)
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 ==== 3. Carrying out Death ==== ==== 3. Carrying out Death ====
  
-[[aker:Death|Ω]] p264 "But sometimes a new potency of life seems to be attributed to the image of Death itself, and by a kind of resurrection it becomes the instrument of the general revival. Thus in some parts of Lusatia women alone are concerned in carrying out Death, and suffer no male to meddle with it."+[[:death|Ω]] p264 "But sometimes a new potency of life seems to be attributed to the image of Death itself, and by a kind of resurrection it becomes the instrument of the general revival. Thus in some parts of Lusatia women alone are concerned in carrying out Death, and suffer no male to meddle with it."
  
-[[aker:Death|Ω]] p266 "​Therefore the being which has just ben destroyed - the so-called Death - must be supposed to be endowed with a vivifying and quickening influence, which it can communicate to the vegetable and even the animal world. This ascription of a life-giving virtue to the figure of Death is put beyond a doubt by the custom, observed in some places, of taking pieces of the straw effigy of Death and placing them in the fields to make the crops grow, or in the manger to make the cattle thrive."​+[[:death|Ω]] p266 "​Therefore the being which has just ben destroyed - the so-called Death - must be supposed to be endowed with a vivifying and quickening influence, which it can communicate to the vegetable and even the animal world. This ascription of a life-giving virtue to the figure of Death is put beyond a doubt by the custom, observed in some places, of taking pieces of the straw effigy of Death and placing them in the fields to make the crops grow, or in the manger to make the cattle thrive."​
  
 p267 "Thus in Spackendorf (Austrian Silesia) the figure of Death made of straw, brushwood, and rags, is carried out with wild songs to an open place outside the village and there burned, and while it is burning a general struggle takes place for the pieces, which are pulled out of the flames with bare hands. Each one who secures a fragment of the effigy ties it to a branch of the largest tree in his garden, or buries it in his field, in the belief that this causes the crops to grow better."​ p267 "Thus in Spackendorf (Austrian Silesia) the figure of Death made of straw, brushwood, and rags, is carried out with wild songs to an open place outside the village and there burned, and while it is burning a general struggle takes place for the pieces, which are pulled out of the flames with bare hands. Each one who secures a fragment of the effigy ties it to a branch of the largest tree in his garden, or buries it in his field, in the belief that this causes the crops to grow better."​
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 p268 "In Leipzig at Mid-Lent men and women of the lowest class used to carry through all the streets a straw effigy of Death, which the exhibited to young wives, and finally threw into the river, alleging that this made young wives fruitful, cleansed the city, and averted the plague and other sickness from the inhabitants for that year." \\ <fc green>​See the timline, //​Mid-Lent//​ = Vernal equinox, the time when spring would start. Death had a huge part to play in the end of the winter and the beginning of the farming or when life would return to the earth and signalled the start of when food would again be yielded from the earth.</​fc>​ p268 "In Leipzig at Mid-Lent men and women of the lowest class used to carry through all the streets a straw effigy of Death, which the exhibited to young wives, and finally threw into the river, alleging that this made young wives fruitful, cleansed the city, and averted the plague and other sickness from the inhabitants for that year." \\ <fc green>​See the timline, //​Mid-Lent//​ = Vernal equinox, the time when spring would start. Death had a huge part to play in the end of the winter and the beginning of the farming or when life would return to the earth and signalled the start of when food would again be yielded from the earth.</​fc>​
  
-[[aker:Death|Ω]] p269 "The customs, therefore, of bringing in the May and bringing in the Summer are essentially the same; and the Summer-tree is merely another form of the May-tree... Therefore, if the explanation here adopted of the May-tree (namely, that it is an embodiment of the tree-spirit or spirit of vegetation) is correct, the Summer-tree must lifewise be an embodiment of the tree-spirit of spirit of vegetation. But we have seen that the Summer-tree is in some cases a //​revivification//​ of the effigy of Death. It follows, therefore, that in these cases the effigy called Death must be an embodiment of the tree-spirit of spirit of vegetation."​\\ ​ <fc green>​Italics mine.</​fc>​+[[:death|Ω]] p269 "The customs, therefore, of bringing in the May and bringing in the Summer are essentially the same; and the Summer-tree is merely another form of the May-tree... Therefore, if the explanation here adopted of the May-tree (namely, that it is an embodiment of the tree-spirit or spirit of vegetation) is correct, the Summer-tree must lifewise be an embodiment of the tree-spirit of spirit of vegetation. But we have seen that the Summer-tree is in some cases a //​revivification//​ of the effigy of Death. It follows, therefore, that in these cases the effigy called Death must be an embodiment of the tree-spirit of spirit of vegetation."​\\ ​ <fc green>​Italics mine.</​fc>​
  
 <fc green>It seems to me the book reaches a conclusion that it has been working towards on page 270:</​fc>​\\ ​ p270 "In short we are driven to regard the expulsion of Death and the bringing in of Summer as, in some cases at least, merely another form of that death and resuscitation of the spirit of vegetation in spring which we saw enacted in the killing and resurrection of the Wild Man. The burial and resurrection of the Carnival is probably another way of expressing the same idea." <fc green>It seems to me the book reaches a conclusion that it has been working towards on page 270:</​fc>​\\ ​ p270 "In short we are driven to regard the expulsion of Death and the bringing in of Summer as, in some cases at least, merely another form of that death and resuscitation of the spirit of vegetation in spring which we saw enacted in the killing and resurrection of the Wild Man. The burial and resurrection of the Carnival is probably another way of expressing the same idea."