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 ==== The First Series ==== ==== The First Series ====
  
-| {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis1.jpg?​linkonly|Plate I-1}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis2.jpg?​linkonly|Plate I-2}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis3.jpg?​linkonly|Plate I-3}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis4.jpg?​linkonly|Plate I-4}} | +| {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis1.jpg?​linkonly|Plate I-1}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis2.jpg?​linkonly|Plate I-2}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis3.jpg?​linkonly|Plate I-3}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis4.jpg?​linkonly|Plate I-4}} | 
-| {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis1.jpg?​200|}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis2.jpg?​200|}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis3.jpg?​200|}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis4.jpg?​200|}} |+| {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis1.jpg?​200|}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis2.jpg?​200|}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis3.jpg?​200|}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis4.jpg?​200|}} |
  
-| {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis5.jpg?​linkonly|Plate I-5}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis6.jpg?​linkonly|Plate I-6}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis7.jpg?​linkonly|Plate I-7}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis8.jpg?​linkonly|Plate I-8}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis9.jpg?​linkonly|Plate I-9}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis10.jpg?​linkonly|Plate I-10}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis11.jpg?​linkonly|Plate I-11}} | +| {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis5.jpg?​linkonly|Plate I-5}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis6.jpg?​linkonly|Plate I-6}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis7.jpg?​linkonly|Plate I-7}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis8.jpg?​linkonly|Plate I-8}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis9.jpg?​linkonly|Plate I-9}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis10.jpg?​linkonly|Plate I-10}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis11.jpg?​linkonly|Plate I-11}} | 
-| {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis5.jpg?​200|}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis6.jpg?​200|}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis7.jpg?​200|}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis8.jpg?​200|}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis9.jpg?​200|}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis10.jpg?​200|}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis11.jpg?​200|}} |+| {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis5.jpg?​200|}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis6.jpg?​200|}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis7.jpg?​200|}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis8.jpg?​200|}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis9.jpg?​200|}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis10.jpg?​200|}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis11.jpg?​200|}} |
  
 === Plate I-1 A Sick Sun and a Healthy Sun === === Plate I-1 A Sick Sun and a Healthy Sun ===
  
-{{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis1.jpg?​300|}}+{{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis1.jpg?​300|}}
  
 <fc blue>'​Arma Artis' = 'The Arms of the Art'</​fc>​ <fc blue>'​Arma Artis' = 'The Arms of the Art'</​fc>​
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 === Plate I-2 Setting Out on the Journey === === Plate I-2 Setting Out on the Journey ===
  
-{{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis2.jpg?​300|}}+{{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis2.jpg?​300|}}
  
 <fc blue>'​Eamus Qesitum Quatuor Elementorum Naturas.'​ = 'We are seeking the nature of the Four Elements.'</​fc>​ <fc blue>'​Eamus Qesitum Quatuor Elementorum Naturas.'​ = 'We are seeking the nature of the Four Elements.'</​fc>​
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 p43 "From ancient times, the deer was used to represent a non-ordinary awareness or capacity to communicate with the spirit world."​\\ <fc green>​They were also hunted, tricky to find, quick through the woods. ​ They were also linked to the Greek goddess Artimis.</​fc>​\\ "​Alchemists used the deer to represent //the spirit within matter//, also represented by //​Mercurius//,​ the androgynous changeable Roman god who was known as Hermes to the Greeks. ...Jung referred to the deer as a symbol of "​Mercurius,​ the essence, moisture, or principle behind or within the quicksilver ....that indefinable,​ fascinating,​ irritating, elusive thing which attracts an unconscious projection ...the //cervus fugitivus// ...[fugitive stag...].<​fc red><​sup>​21</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​21</​sup></​fc><​sub>​CW13 §259</​sub>​ p43 "From ancient times, the deer was used to represent a non-ordinary awareness or capacity to communicate with the spirit world."​\\ <fc green>​They were also hunted, tricky to find, quick through the woods. ​ They were also linked to the Greek goddess Artimis.</​fc>​\\ "​Alchemists used the deer to represent //the spirit within matter//, also represented by //​Mercurius//,​ the androgynous changeable Roman god who was known as Hermes to the Greeks. ...Jung referred to the deer as a symbol of "​Mercurius,​ the essence, moisture, or principle behind or within the quicksilver ....that indefinable,​ fascinating,​ irritating, elusive thing which attracts an unconscious projection ...the //cervus fugitivus// ...[fugitive stag...].<​fc red><​sup>​21</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​21</​sup></​fc><​sub>​CW13 §259</​sub>​
  
-p43 "The alchemists believed that metals differed from one another because they contained greater or lesser amounts of particular //​qualities//​. ​ According to Paracelsus'​ theory of //[[aker:​alchemy#​Three Primes|tria prima]]//, the three fundanental properties of matter were represented by:\\  mercury (fluid connection between the High and the Low) {{:aker:alchemy:​20px-Mercury_symbol.png?​nolink|Mercury}};​ closely associated with silver, the Moon, and the Feminine Principle.<​fc red><​sup>​23</​sup></​fc>​\\ sulfur (omnipresent spirit of life) {{:aker:alchemy:​20px-Sulphur.png?​nolink&​13|Sulphur}};​ associated with Sol, the sun, and thus with the masculine Principle\\ ​ and salt (base matter) {{:aker:alchemy:​20px-Line_within_circle.png?​nolink|Salt}};​ the fixed immutable, quality of matter - was associated with body and earth.\\ <fc red><​sup>​23</​sup></​fc><​sub>​John Read in //Prelude to Chemistry//,​ p. 102 notes that, 'In **exoteric** alchemy, Sol and Luna denoted gold and silver; but in the **esoteric** literature and operations of the adepts these terms usually stood for sophic sulphur and sophic mercury respectively - or for "our sulphur"​ and "our mercury,"​ as they were often called. ​ The best source of sophic sulphur was commonly held to be gold; and thus such terms as sophic sulphur, gold of the philosophers and seed of gold are to a large extent synonymous in alchemical literature. ​ For this reason, both gold and sulphur - of the sophic kind - were identified by the adepts with the masculine principle and represented by the symbol of Sol, which has always been associated with ordinary gold.  Again, the feminine principle, sophic mercury, was linked with silver, owing to an imagined relationship between quicksilver (agent-vive) and silver (argent): the **exoteric** symbol of Luna was therefore transferred by the adepts to denote sophic mercury. ​ This dual application of the symbols of Sol and Luna has given rise to much confusion of thought, not only among the original alchemists, but also among their commentators'​ </​sub>​+p43 "The alchemists believed that metals differed from one another because they contained greater or lesser amounts of particular //​qualities//​. ​ According to Paracelsus'​ theory of //​[[:​alchemy#​Three Primes|tria prima]]//, the three fundanental properties of matter were represented by:\\  mercury (fluid connection between the High and the Low) {{alchemy:​20px-mercury_symbol.png?​nolink|Mercury}};​ closely associated with silver, the Moon, and the Feminine Principle.<​fc red><​sup>​23</​sup></​fc>​\\ sulfur (omnipresent spirit of life) {{alchemy:​20px-sulphur.png?​nolink&​13|Sulphur}};​ associated with Sol, the sun, and thus with the masculine Principle\\ ​ and salt (base matter) {{alchemy:​20px-line_within_circle.png?​nolink|Salt}};​ the fixed immutable, quality of matter - was associated with body and earth.\\ <fc red><​sup>​23</​sup></​fc><​sub>​John Read in //Prelude to Chemistry//,​ p. 102 notes that, 'In **exoteric** alchemy, Sol and Luna denoted gold and silver; but in the **esoteric** literature and operations of the adepts these terms usually stood for sophic sulphur and sophic mercury respectively - or for "our sulphur"​ and "our mercury,"​ as they were often called. ​ The best source of sophic sulphur was commonly held to be gold; and thus such terms as sophic sulphur, gold of the philosophers and seed of gold are to a large extent synonymous in alchemical literature. ​ For this reason, both gold and sulphur - of the sophic kind - were identified by the adepts with the masculine principle and represented by the symbol of Sol, which has always been associated with ordinary gold.  Again, the feminine principle, sophic mercury, was linked with silver, owing to an imagined relationship between quicksilver (agent-vive) and silver (argent): the **exoteric** symbol of Luna was therefore transferred by the adepts to denote sophic mercury. ​ This dual application of the symbols of Sol and Luna has given rise to much confusion of thought, not only among the original alchemists, but also among their commentators'​ </​sub>​
  
 === Plate I-3 The Inner Quest === === Plate I-3 The Inner Quest ===
  
-{{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis3.jpg?​300|}}+{{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis3.jpg?​300|}}
  
 ~~SEARCHPATTERN#'/​(.*§273 \s*([^\n\r]+).*)/​i'??​ +aker:​collected_works:​cw13 _sprender $quote ??~~ ~~SEARCHPATTERN#'/​(.*§273 \s*([^\n\r]+).*)/​i'??​ +aker:​collected_works:​cw13 _sprender $quote ??~~
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 === Plate I-4 The King and the Queen === === Plate I-4 The King and the Queen ===
  
-{{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis4.jpg?​300|}}+{{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis4.jpg?​300|}}
  
 <fc blue> '​Coagula Masculinum,'​ or '​Coagulate the Masculine.'</​fc>​\\ ​ <fc blue> '​Coagula Masculinum,'​ or '​Coagulate the Masculine.'</​fc>​\\ ​
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 p57 "'​The popularity of the legend of Alexander as a symbol of the height of achievement for a masculine warrior-hero served as one of his most persistent legacies to later ages.... ​ When at Alexander'​s deathbed his commanders asked him to whom he bequeathed his kingdom, he replied, "To the most powerful."'<​fc red><​sup>​60</​sup></​fc>"​ p57 "'​The popularity of the legend of Alexander as a symbol of the height of achievement for a masculine warrior-hero served as one of his most persistent legacies to later ages.... ​ When at Alexander'​s deathbed his commanders asked him to whom he bequeathed his kingdom, he replied, "To the most powerful."'<​fc red><​sup>​60</​sup></​fc>"​
  
-p59 <fc green>​The meeting of Alexander the Great and the Greek philosopher,​ [[wp>​Diogenes//​of//​Sinope#​Diogenes//​and//​Alexander|Diogenes]] ​ Cf. [[aker:collected_works:​cw5|CW5]],​ §405 about Diogenes approach to life.</​fc>​+p59 <fc green>​The meeting of Alexander the Great and the Greek philosopher,​ [[wp>​Diogenes//​of//​Sinope#​Diogenes//​and//​Alexander|Diogenes]] ​ Cf. [[collected_works:​cw5|CW5]],​ §405 about Diogenes approach to life.</​fc>​
  
 p60 "The alchemists'​ development beyond an overvaluation of worldly power and mastery (wanting actual gold) was made explicit by the author of the //Splendor Solis//, Salomon Trismosin, in a simple verse appended to his '​alchemical wanderings':<​fc red><​sup>​63</​sup></​fc>​ p60 "The alchemists'​ development beyond an overvaluation of worldly power and mastery (wanting actual gold) was made explicit by the author of the //Splendor Solis//, Salomon Trismosin, in a simple verse appended to his '​alchemical wanderings':<​fc red><​sup>​63</​sup></​fc>​
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 === Plate I-5 Digging for Gold ===  === Plate I-5 Digging for Gold === 
  
-{{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis5.jpg?​300|}}+{{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis5.jpg?​300|}}
  
 <fc blue>'​Esthes'​ = '​Esther'​ from the bible.</​fc>​\\ ​ <fc blue>'​Esthes'​ = '​Esther'​ from the bible.</​fc>​\\ ​
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 === Plate I-6 The Philosophical Tree ===  === Plate I-6 The Philosophical Tree === 
  
-{{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis6.jpg?​300|}}+{{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis6.jpg?​300|}}
  
 ~~SEARCHPATTERN#'/​(.*§304 \s*([^\n\r]+).*)/​i'??​ +aker:​collected_works:​cw13 _sprender $quote ??~~ ~~SEARCHPATTERN#'/​(.*§304 \s*([^\n\r]+).*)/​i'??​ +aker:​collected_works:​cw13 _sprender $quote ??~~
  
-<fc green>​cRef CW13, the '[[aker:collected_works:​cw13&#​v_the_philosophical_tree_304_-_482|Philosophical Tree]]'</​fc>​+<fc green>​cRef CW13, the '​[[collected_works:​cw13#​v_the_philosophical_tree_304_-_482|Philosophical Tree]]'</​fc>​
  
 p69 <fc green>In the image there is a guy passing a branch to what could be the adepts/​alchemists. ​ It is important that they hold a branch already that has no leaves. ​ The branch being passed to them has leaves. ​ Its almost as though they'​ve 'used up' the one branch and are now getting a new one with which to work.  There'​s something of a circular theme here, a re-solving, the dissolve and coagulate cycle, //solva et coagula//​.</​fc>​ p69 <fc green>In the image there is a guy passing a branch to what could be the adepts/​alchemists. ​ It is important that they hold a branch already that has no leaves. ​ The branch being passed to them has leaves. ​ Its almost as though they'​ve 'used up' the one branch and are now getting a new one with which to work.  There'​s something of a circular theme here, a re-solving, the dissolve and coagulate cycle, //solva et coagula//​.</​fc>​
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 === Plate I-7 The Drowning of the King ===  === Plate I-7 The Drowning of the King === 
  
-{{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis7.jpg?​300|}}+{{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis7.jpg?​300|}}
  
 p177 <fc green>​Read the parable associated with the image. ​ It is important that the picture is not a moment in time but has a chronology to it; the old man dies, calls out to be saved, is not saved, the young king emerges ...there is a whole narrative in this image. ​ I think that many of the other images may too have a chronology in them, like von Franz has said of the //Aurora Consurgens//​ parables (cRef p46 above), each one is the opus in itself.</​fc>​ p177 <fc green>​Read the parable associated with the image. ​ It is important that the picture is not a moment in time but has a chronology to it; the old man dies, calls out to be saved, is not saved, the young king emerges ...there is a whole narrative in this image. ​ I think that many of the other images may too have a chronology in them, like von Franz has said of the //Aurora Consurgens//​ parables (cRef p46 above), each one is the opus in itself.</​fc>​
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 === Plate I-8 The Ethiopian ===  === Plate I-8 The Ethiopian === 
  
-{{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis8.jpg?​300|}}+{{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis8.jpg?​300|}}
  
 <fc green>​cf. CW13, Alchemical Studies, Jung mentions this plate referencing the Ethiopian as Mercurius. This makes sense when you consider the '​dynamic'​ nature of this ethiopian and all he is; the different colours etc. </fc> <fc green>​cf. CW13, Alchemical Studies, Jung mentions this plate referencing the Ethiopian as Mercurius. This makes sense when you consider the '​dynamic'​ nature of this ethiopian and all he is; the different colours etc. </fc>
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 === Plate I-9 The Hermaphrodite ===  === Plate I-9 The Hermaphrodite === 
  
-{{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis9.jpg?​300|}}+{{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis9.jpg?​300|}}
  
 p90 "The figure has two heads and necks: one is a clean-shaven man with sandy hair and blue eyes; the other is a woman, also with blue eyes and fair, reddish hair.<fc red><​sup>​122</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​122</​sup></​fc><​sub>​In '​Psychology of the Transference,'​ Jung discusses an image of the hermaphrodite from another famous alchemical treatise of the sixteenth century, the //Rosarium Philosophorum//​ (CW16 §§525-37)</​sub>​ p90 "The figure has two heads and necks: one is a clean-shaven man with sandy hair and blue eyes; the other is a woman, also with blue eyes and fair, reddish hair.<fc red><​sup>​122</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​122</​sup></​fc><​sub>​In '​Psychology of the Transference,'​ Jung discusses an image of the hermaphrodite from another famous alchemical treatise of the sixteenth century, the //Rosarium Philosophorum//​ (CW16 §§525-37)</​sub>​
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 === Plate I-10 The Golden Head ===  === Plate I-10 The Golden Head === 
  
-{{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis10.jpg?​300|}}+{{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis10.jpg?​300|}}
  
 p95 "One might say that the image of the hermaphrodite as a resolution of the problem of the opposites is contrived, facile, or too intellectual. ​ So we see that as we move along from one plate to the next, there is an anticipation of a solution to the problem of the opposites, followed by a more integrated, embodied, and lived solution, only to be followed by destruction and then a new anticipation.<​fc green>​[Death & rebirth]</​fc>​ \\ Once again we must be reminded that fresh insight into the problem of the opposites involving an artificial union can easily be overvalued. ​ There is always the danger of getting fixated upon the insight without the embodiment of the transformation. ...The hermaphrodite,​ then, is an imperfect, or premature, image of the Self, but not a final image. ...Hence the ruthless //​separatio//​ of the present picture.\\ At this stage, separation involves a sacrifice. ​ We are reminded of the theme of sacrifice and decapitation in the vision of Zosimos,​...<​fc red><​sup>​134</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​134</​sup></​fc><​sub>​See CW 13 §95, for parallels between this plate and the golden head and dismemberment in the visions of Zosimos. ​ Jung suggested that, 'the golden head referred originally to the head of Osiris ...' and that, 'The Greek alchemists styled themselves as "​Children of the Golden Head"'​ (CW 12 §530).</​sub>​\\ <fc green>​The head is also the rational and logic of understanding. ​ If you understand or contain the //​coniunctio//,​ the symbol and if you rationalise or '​own'​ it, name it without experiencing it you will be inflated, you lose it, so cut off the head.</​fc>​ p95 "One might say that the image of the hermaphrodite as a resolution of the problem of the opposites is contrived, facile, or too intellectual. ​ So we see that as we move along from one plate to the next, there is an anticipation of a solution to the problem of the opposites, followed by a more integrated, embodied, and lived solution, only to be followed by destruction and then a new anticipation.<​fc green>​[Death & rebirth]</​fc>​ \\ Once again we must be reminded that fresh insight into the problem of the opposites involving an artificial union can easily be overvalued. ​ There is always the danger of getting fixated upon the insight without the embodiment of the transformation. ...The hermaphrodite,​ then, is an imperfect, or premature, image of the Self, but not a final image. ...Hence the ruthless //​separatio//​ of the present picture.\\ At this stage, separation involves a sacrifice. ​ We are reminded of the theme of sacrifice and decapitation in the vision of Zosimos,​...<​fc red><​sup>​134</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​134</​sup></​fc><​sub>​See CW 13 §95, for parallels between this plate and the golden head and dismemberment in the visions of Zosimos. ​ Jung suggested that, 'the golden head referred originally to the head of Osiris ...' and that, 'The Greek alchemists styled themselves as "​Children of the Golden Head"'​ (CW 12 §530).</​sub>​\\ <fc green>​The head is also the rational and logic of understanding. ​ If you understand or contain the //​coniunctio//,​ the symbol and if you rationalise or '​own'​ it, name it without experiencing it you will be inflated, you lose it, so cut off the head.</​fc>​
  
-<fc green>​Also,​ cRef [[aker:collected_works:​cw13|CW13]] Visions of Zosimos regarding the dismemberment of the body :</​fc> ​+<fc green>​Also,​ cRef [[collected_works:​cw13|CW13]] Visions of Zosimos regarding the dismemberment of the body :</​fc> ​
  
 ~~SEARCHPATTERN#'/​(.*§89 \s*([^\n\r]+).*)/​i'??​ +aker:​collected_works:​cw13 _sprender $quote ??~~ ~~SEARCHPATTERN#'/​(.*§89 \s*([^\n\r]+).*)/​i'??​ +aker:​collected_works:​cw13 _sprender $quote ??~~
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 === Plate I-11 The Alchemist in the Bath ===  === Plate I-11 The Alchemist in the Bath === 
  
-{{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis11.jpg?​300|}}+{{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis11.jpg?​300|}}
  
 p98-99 "​Vulcan,​ or //​Hephaistos//​ the blacksmith, is the great shaman of Greek mythology. ​ According to Homer, Hephaistos came to Her's aid when Zeus threatened her.  Zeus hurled Hephaistos off of Mount Olympus, and he ws crippled by the fall.  He had to fend for himself apart from the rest of the gods, but he learned how to transform base metals into valuable things, including beautiful jewelry. ​ He stands for that ability to create order and beauty out of what would otherwise be chaos."​\\ <fc green>If these illustrations are at all chronological in their perspective,​ i.e. as with I-7, then I wonder if Jupiter & Mercury are the start, Hephaistos the next step or part of the journey to the Alchemist in the bath all contained in the Alembic in the foreground.</​fc>​ p98-99 "​Vulcan,​ or //​Hephaistos//​ the blacksmith, is the great shaman of Greek mythology. ​ According to Homer, Hephaistos came to Her's aid when Zeus threatened her.  Zeus hurled Hephaistos off of Mount Olympus, and he ws crippled by the fall.  He had to fend for himself apart from the rest of the gods, but he learned how to transform base metals into valuable things, including beautiful jewelry. ​ He stands for that ability to create order and beauty out of what would otherwise be chaos."​\\ <fc green>If these illustrations are at all chronological in their perspective,​ i.e. as with I-7, then I wonder if Jupiter & Mercury are the start, Hephaistos the next step or part of the journey to the Alchemist in the bath all contained in the Alembic in the foreground.</​fc>​
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 ^ **Saturn** ^ **Jupiter** ^ **Mars** ^ **Sun** ^ **Venus** ^ **Mercury** ^ **Luna (Moon)** ^ ^ **Saturn** ^ **Jupiter** ^ **Mars** ^ **Sun** ^ **Venus** ^ **Mercury** ^ **Luna (Moon)** ^
-| {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis12.jpg?​linkonly|Plate II-12}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis13.jpg?​linkonly|Plate II-13}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis14.jpg?​linkonly|Plate II-14}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis15.jpg?​linkonly|Plate II-14}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis16.jpg?​linkonly|Plate II-16}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis17.jpg?​linkonly|Plate II-17}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis18.jpg?​linkonly|Plate II-8}} | +| {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis12.jpg?​linkonly|Plate II-12}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis13.jpg?​linkonly|Plate II-13}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis14.jpg?​linkonly|Plate II-14}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis15.jpg?​linkonly|Plate II-14}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis16.jpg?​linkonly|Plate II-16}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis17.jpg?​linkonly|Plate II-17}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis18.jpg?​linkonly|Plate II-8}} | 
-| {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis12.jpg?​200|}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis13.jpg?​200|}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis14.jpg?​200|}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis15.jpg?​200|}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis16.jpg?​200|}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis17.jpg?​200|}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis18.jpg?​200|}} |+| {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis12.jpg?​200|}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis13.jpg?​200|}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis14.jpg?​200|}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis15.jpg?​200|}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis16.jpg?​200|}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis17.jpg?​200|}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis18.jpg?​200|}} |
  
 {{page>​books_and_literature:​the_planets_and_their_children}} {{page>​books_and_literature:​the_planets_and_their_children}}
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 <fc green>​Saturn</​fc>​ <fc green>​Saturn</​fc>​
  
-{{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis12.jpg?​300|}}+{{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis12.jpg?​300|}}
  
-[[aker:​books_and_literature:​main.alchemy|Δ]] p111 "Jung pointed out that '​Saturn is the father and origin of Mercurius, therefore the latter is called "​Saturn'​s child"​.'" ​+[[Main.Alchemy|Δ]] p111 "Jung pointed out that '​Saturn is the father and origin of Mercurius, therefore the latter is called "​Saturn'​s child"​.'" ​
  
 ~~SEARCHPATTERN#'/​(.*§274 \s*([^\n\r]+).*)/​i'??​ +aker:​collected_works:​cw13 _sprender $quote ??~~ ~~SEARCHPATTERN#'/​(.*§274 \s*([^\n\r]+).*)/​i'??​ +aker:​collected_works:​cw13 _sprender $quote ??~~
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 === Plate II-13 Three birds (2 of 7) === === Plate II-13 Three birds (2 of 7) ===
  
-{{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis13.jpg?​300|}}+{{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis13.jpg?​300|}}
  
 <fc green>​Jupiter</​fc>​ <fc green>​Jupiter</​fc>​
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 === Plate II-14 A Three-headed bird (3 of 7) === === Plate II-14 A Three-headed bird (3 of 7) ===
  
-{{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis14.jpg?​300|}}+{{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis14.jpg?​300|}}
  
 <fc green>​Mars</​fc>​ <fc green>​Mars</​fc>​
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 === Plate II-15 A Three-headed Dragon (4 of 7) === === Plate II-15 A Three-headed Dragon (4 of 7) ===
  
-{{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis15.jpg?​300|}}+{{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis15.jpg?​300|}}
  
 <fc green>​Sol (sun)</​fc>​ <fc green>​Sol (sun)</​fc>​
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 p135 "​Chinese dragons, like this dragon, represent the embodiment of the life force in Nature, which creates from the ground up and not from above by the bidding of celestial gods." p135 "​Chinese dragons, like this dragon, represent the embodiment of the life force in Nature, which creates from the ground up and not from above by the bidding of celestial gods."
  
-[[aker:Death|Ω]] p136 "Jung suggested that the triadic aspect of Mercurius, who was often represented as a three-headed snake, is the chthonic counterpart to the Christian Trinity.<​fc red><​sup>​77</​sup></​fc>​\\ <fc red><​sup>​77</​sup></​fc><​sub>'​The Unity and Trinity of Mercurius,'​ CW13, §§270-2</​sub>​+[[:death|Ω]] p136 "Jung suggested that the triadic aspect of Mercurius, who was often represented as a three-headed snake, is the chthonic counterpart to the Christian Trinity.<​fc red><​sup>​77</​sup></​fc>​\\ <fc red><​sup>​77</​sup></​fc><​sub>'​The Unity and Trinity of Mercurius,'​ CW13, §§270-2</​sub>​
  
 ~~SEARCHPATTERN#'/​(.*§270 \s*([^\n\r]+).*)/​i'??​ +aker:​collected_works:​cw13 _sprender $quote ??~~ ~~SEARCHPATTERN#'/​(.*§270 \s*([^\n\r]+).*)/​i'??​ +aker:​collected_works:​cw13 _sprender $quote ??~~
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 === Plate II-16 The Peacock (5 of 7) === === Plate II-16 The Peacock (5 of 7) ===
  
-{{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis16.jpg?​300|}}+{{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis16.jpg?​300|}}
  
 <fc green>​Venus</​fc>​ <fc green>​Venus</​fc>​
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 === Plate II-17 The Muse (6 of 7) === === Plate II-17 The Muse (6 of 7) ===
  
-{{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis17.jpg?​300|}}+{{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis17.jpg?​300|}}
  
 <fc green>​Mercury - (Queen in the alembic)</​fc>​ <fc green>​Mercury - (Queen in the alembic)</​fc>​
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 === Plate II-18 The New Sun as Inner Light (7 of 7) === === Plate II-18 The New Sun as Inner Light (7 of 7) ===
  
-{{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis18.jpg?​300|}}+{{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis18.jpg?​300|}}
  
 <fc green>​Luna (moon) - (King in the alembic)</​fc>​ <fc green>​Luna (moon) - (King in the alembic)</​fc>​
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 ==== The Third Series ==== ==== The Third Series ====
  
-| {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis19.jpg?​200|}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis20.jpg?​200|}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis21.jpg?​200|}} | {{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis22.jpg?​200|}} | +| {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis19.jpg?​200|}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis20.jpg?​200|}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis21.jpg?​200|}} | {{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis22.jpg?​200|}} | 
  
 <fc green>​Cross reference Book Prelude to Chemistry ...</​fc>​\\ ​ <fc green>​Cross reference Book Prelude to Chemistry ...</​fc>​\\ ​
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 === Plate III-1 (19) The Dark Sun === === Plate III-1 (19) The Dark Sun ===
  
-{{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis19.jpg?​300|}}+{{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis19.jpg?​300|}}
  
 <fc green>​Notice the sun is looking left (unconscious realm), whereas in the 4th plate the sun is looking right (consciousness). ​ Could this image be a mirror image of the 4th plate (4th in this series, image #22).  It is a black sun but has golden rays...there'​s something of that here I think. ​ This could perhaps explain too why the black sun is visible in the earth. ​ The dark sun is the individuals shadow that is half conscious but not really and yet still comes to bear on the light of consciousness,​ the //lumen naturae//​. ​ For the most part the shadow is still in the earth, still elemental and instinctual in energy, but has broken into consciousness,​ so the journey begins. ​ There'​s definitely something of a '​mirror image' between the 1st and 4th plate here...\\ \\ The burnt out and cut off trees in the foreground with the new - gold tinged - growth from the stumps reminds me of the fire-breaks in SA where they would burn wide paths of veld as fire breaks or burn whole parts of the veld to encourage new growth. ​ New things would flourish out the ash as it was full of nutrients for the new growth.</​fc>​ <fc green>​Notice the sun is looking left (unconscious realm), whereas in the 4th plate the sun is looking right (consciousness). ​ Could this image be a mirror image of the 4th plate (4th in this series, image #22).  It is a black sun but has golden rays...there'​s something of that here I think. ​ This could perhaps explain too why the black sun is visible in the earth. ​ The dark sun is the individuals shadow that is half conscious but not really and yet still comes to bear on the light of consciousness,​ the //lumen naturae//​. ​ For the most part the shadow is still in the earth, still elemental and instinctual in energy, but has broken into consciousness,​ so the journey begins. ​ There'​s definitely something of a '​mirror image' between the 1st and 4th plate here...\\ \\ The burnt out and cut off trees in the foreground with the new - gold tinged - growth from the stumps reminds me of the fire-breaks in SA where they would burn wide paths of veld as fire breaks or burn whole parts of the veld to encourage new growth. ​ New things would flourish out the ash as it was full of nutrients for the new growth.</​fc>​
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 === Plate III-2 (20) Children at Play === === Plate III-2 (20) Children at Play ===
  
-{{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis20.jpg?​300|}}+{{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis20.jpg?​300|}}
  
 <fc green>​There are 10 children in this picture, as noted:</​fc>​ <fc green>​There are 10 children in this picture, as noted:</​fc>​
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 === Plate III-3 (21) Women Washing == === Plate III-3 (21) Women Washing ==
  
-{{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis21.jpg?​300|}}+{{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis21.jpg?​300|}}
  
 === Plate III-4 (22) The Journey'​s End == === Plate III-4 (22) The Journey'​s End ==
  
-{{:aker:books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis22.jpg?​300|}}+{{books_and_literature:​transformation_of_the_psyche:​solis22.jpg?​300|}}
  
 p169 "These final four paintings show us that the process itself - not the origin, nor the goal - is the only expression of completion."​ p169 "These final four paintings show us that the process itself - not the origin, nor the goal - is the only expression of completion."​