Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
collected_works:cw5 [2017/02/14 04:18]
janus ↷ Page moved from aker:collected_works:cw5 to collected_works:cw5
collected_works:cw5 [2017/02/14 05:08] (current)
janus ↷ Links adapted because of a move operation
Line 14: Line 14:
  
 §2 "The //​leitmotiv//​ of all these works is to find a clue to historical problems through the application of insights derived from the activity of the unconscious psyche **in modern man.** "​\\ ​ §2 "The //​leitmotiv//​ of all these works is to find a clue to historical problems through the application of insights derived from the activity of the unconscious psyche **in modern man.** "​\\ ​
-[[aker:Alchemy|Δ]] §3 "But, as things are at present, it seems to me imperative that they should broaden the basis of this analysis by a comparative study of the historical material, ... For, just as psychological knowledge furthers our understanding of the historical material, so, conversely, the historical material can throw new light on individual psychological problems."​\\ <fc green>It great here how Jung explains why he directs his attention to the historical material to 'gain fresh insight'​ into the psychological material. ​ Hence the living hell that is trying to follow the encyclopaedic material that is Jung :) </fc>+[[:alchemy|Δ]] §3 "But, as things are at present, it seems to me imperative that they should broaden the basis of this analysis by a comparative study of the historical material, ... For, just as psychological knowledge furthers our understanding of the historical material, so, conversely, the historical material can throw new light on individual psychological problems."​\\ <fc green>It great here how Jung explains why he directs his attention to the historical material to 'gain fresh insight'​ into the psychological material. ​ Hence the living hell that is trying to follow the encyclopaedic material that is Jung :) </fc>
  
 §3 "In my later writings <fc green>​[post 1912]</​fc>​ I have concerned myself chiefly with the question of historical and ethnological parallels..." ​ <fc green>​The reason why Jung got into the historical context of things so much :)  Cf. the closing comment of paragraph 336.</​fc>​ §3 "In my later writings <fc green>​[post 1912]</​fc>​ I have concerned myself chiefly with the question of historical and ethnological parallels..." ​ <fc green>​The reason why Jung got into the historical context of things so much :)  Cf. the closing comment of paragraph 336.</​fc>​
Line 93: Line 93:
 §37 <fc green>'​fantasy'​ or </​fc>"​...subjective thinking, ...judged from the standpoint of adaptation, is inferior to that of directed thinking. ... Non-directed thinking is in the main subjectively motivated, and not so much by conscious motives as - far more - by unconscious ones.  It certainly produces a world-picture very different from that of conscious, directed thinking. ​ But there is no real ground for assuming that it is nothing more than a distortion of the objective world-picture,​ for it remains to be asked whether the mainly unconscious inner motive which guides these fantasy-processes is not **itself an objective fact**."​ <fc green>​(Emphasis mine)</​fc>​ §37 <fc green>'​fantasy'​ or </​fc>"​...subjective thinking, ...judged from the standpoint of adaptation, is inferior to that of directed thinking. ... Non-directed thinking is in the main subjectively motivated, and not so much by conscious motives as - far more - by unconscious ones.  It certainly produces a world-picture very different from that of conscious, directed thinking. ​ But there is no real ground for assuming that it is nothing more than a distortion of the objective world-picture,​ for it remains to be asked whether the mainly unconscious inner motive which guides these fantasy-processes is not **itself an objective fact**."​ <fc green>​(Emphasis mine)</​fc>​
  
-§38 "The unconscious bases of dreams and fantasies are only apparently infantile reminiscences. ​ In reality we are concerned with primitive or archaic thought-forms,​ based on **instinct**,​ which naturally emerge more clearly in childhood than they do later. ​ but they are not in themselves infantile, much less pathological. ... So also the myth, which is likewise based on unconscious fantasy-processes,​ is, in meaning, substance, and form, far from being infantile or the expression of an autoerotic or autistic attitude ...\\ Th instinctive,​ archaic basis of the mind is a matter of plain objective fact and is no more dependent upon individual experience or personal choice than is the inherited structure and functioning of the brain or any other organ. ​ Just as the body has its evolutionary history and shows clear traces of the various evolutionary stages, so too does the psyche.<​fc red><​sup>​38</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​38</​sup></​fc><​sub>​See my paper " [[aker:collected_works:​cw8&#​on_the_nature_of_the_psyche_343_-_442|On the Nature of the Psyche]]"​ (1955 edn., pp. 411f.).</​sub>​+§38 "The unconscious bases of dreams and fantasies are only apparently infantile reminiscences. ​ In reality we are concerned with primitive or archaic thought-forms,​ based on **instinct**,​ which naturally emerge more clearly in childhood than they do later. ​ but they are not in themselves infantile, much less pathological. ... So also the myth, which is likewise based on unconscious fantasy-processes,​ is, in meaning, substance, and form, far from being infantile or the expression of an autoerotic or autistic attitude ...\\ Th instinctive,​ archaic basis of the mind is a matter of plain objective fact and is no more dependent upon individual experience or personal choice than is the inherited structure and functioning of the brain or any other organ. ​ Just as the body has its evolutionary history and shows clear traces of the various evolutionary stages, so too does the psyche.<​fc red><​sup>​38</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​38</​sup></​fc><​sub>​See my paper " [[collected_works:​cw8#​on_the_nature_of_the_psyche_343_-_442|On the Nature of the Psyche]]"​ (1955 edn., pp. 411f.).</​sub>​
  
 §39 "The fantasy-products directly engaging the conscious mind are; <fc green>\\ (1) Waking dreams, conscious fantasies.\\ (2) Sleep dreams\\ (3) Split off complexes. </fc> §39 "The fantasy-products directly engaging the conscious mind are; <fc green>\\ (1) Waking dreams, conscious fantasies.\\ (2) Sleep dreams\\ (3) Split off complexes. </fc>
Line 130: Line 130:
  
 <fc green>​Not directly related to Miss Miller but an interesting point nonetheless...</​fc>​ <fc green>​Not directly related to Miss Miller but an interesting point nonetheless...</​fc>​
-§62 "We know from analytical experience that the initial dreams of patients at the beginning of an analysis are of especial interest, not least because they often bring out a critical evaluation of the doctor'​s personality which previously he would have asked for in vain. ...\\ A further peculiarity,​ which seems due to the historical stratification of the unconscious,​ is that when an impression is denied conscious recognition it reverts to an earlier form of relationship. ... <fc red><​sup>​4</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​4</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Here I purposely give preference to the term "​imago"​ rather than to "​complex,"​ in order to make clear, by this choice of a technical term, that the psychological factor which I sum up under "​imago"​ has a living independence in the psychic hierarchy, i.e., possesses that //​autonomy//​ which wide experience has shown to be the essential feature of feeling-toned complexes. ...(Cf. my "​Psychology of Dementia Praecox,"​ chs. 2 and 3.) ... In my later writings, I use the term "​archetype"​ instead, in order to bring out the fact that we are dealing with impersonal collective forces.</​sub>​\\ <fc red><​sup>​5</​sup></​fc><​sub>​The idea that the masculine deity is derived from the father-imago need be taken literally only within the limits of a personalistic psychology. ​ Closer investigation of the father-imago has shown that certain collective components are contained in it from the beginning and cannot be reduced to personal experiences. ​ Cf. my essay, " [[aker:collected_works:​cw7|The Relations between the Ego and the Unconscious]],"​ pp. 129ff. In [[aker:collected_works:​cw7|CW 7]].</​sub>​\\ ​+§62 "We know from analytical experience that the initial dreams of patients at the beginning of an analysis are of especial interest, not least because they often bring out a critical evaluation of the doctor'​s personality which previously he would have asked for in vain. ...\\ A further peculiarity,​ which seems due to the historical stratification of the unconscious,​ is that when an impression is denied conscious recognition it reverts to an earlier form of relationship. ... <fc red><​sup>​4</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​4</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Here I purposely give preference to the term "​imago"​ rather than to "​complex,"​ in order to make clear, by this choice of a technical term, that the psychological factor which I sum up under "​imago"​ has a living independence in the psychic hierarchy, i.e., possesses that //​autonomy//​ which wide experience has shown to be the essential feature of feeling-toned complexes. ...(Cf. my "​Psychology of Dementia Praecox,"​ chs. 2 and 3.) ... In my later writings, I use the term "​archetype"​ instead, in order to bring out the fact that we are dealing with impersonal collective forces.</​sub>​\\ <fc red><​sup>​5</​sup></​fc><​sub>​The idea that the masculine deity is derived from the father-imago need be taken literally only within the limits of a personalistic psychology. ​ Closer investigation of the father-imago has shown that certain collective components are contained in it from the beginning and cannot be reduced to personal experiences. ​ Cf. my essay, " [[collected_works:​cw7|The Relations between the Ego and the Unconscious]],"​ pp. 129ff. In [[collected_works:​cw7|CW 7]].</​sub>​\\ ​
 <fc green>​Cf. this with §92, and §263</​fc>​ <fc green>​Cf. this with §92, and §263</​fc>​
  
Line 138: Line 138:
 <fc green>​Some Greek in footnote 9, p45... </​fc>​\\ ​ <fc green>​Some Greek in footnote 9, p45... </​fc>​\\ ​
  
-<fc green>​And also</​fc>​ [[aker:​greek_words#​λόγος|λόγος]] [[aker:​greek_words#​σπερματικός|σπερματικός]] ​+<fc green>​And also</​fc>​ [[:​greek_words#​λόγος|λόγος]] [[:​greek_words#​σπερματικός|σπερματικός]] ​
  
 §67 "The allusions to Anaxagoras and Leibniz both refer to creation through thought, ..."​\\ ​ §67 "The allusions to Anaxagoras and Leibniz both refer to creation through thought, ..."​\\ ​
Line 158: Line 158:
  
 §81-83 <fc green>​Jung mentions and discusses here a little bit the poem "The Raven",​ by Edgar Allan Poe. </​fc>​\\ ​ §81-83 <fc green>​Jung mentions and discusses here a little bit the poem "The Raven",​ by Edgar Allan Poe. </​fc>​\\ ​
-<fc red><​sup>​21</​sup></​fc><​sub>​ ...Cf. the significance of the raven in alchemy, where it is a synonym for the //nigredo// //[[aker:collected_works:​cw12|Psychology and Alchemy]]//,​ pp. 218f. </​sub>​+<fc red><​sup>​21</​sup></​fc><​sub>​ ...Cf. the significance of the raven in alchemy, where it is a synonym for the //nigredo// //​[[collected_works:​cw12|Psychology and Alchemy]]//,​ pp. 218f. </​sub>​
  
 §86-89 <fc green>As Jung talks here of Job, the Behemoth and Leviathan, and the power of nature it pricks a thought I've had and wondered about when it comes to Job - specifically,​ Jung's comment:</​fc>​ §89 "What was it that destroyed Job's earthly paradise? The unchained power of Nature."​\\ ​ §86-89 <fc green>As Jung talks here of Job, the Behemoth and Leviathan, and the power of nature it pricks a thought I've had and wondered about when it comes to Job - specifically,​ Jung's comment:</​fc>​ §89 "What was it that destroyed Job's earthly paradise? The unchained power of Nature."​\\ ​
Line 185: Line 185:
 §101 "​...since,​ as a rule, the energy of an archetype is not at the disposal of the conscious mind. ... \\ It is a psychological fact that an archetype can seize hold of the ego and even compel it to act as it - the archetype - wills."​\\ <fc green>In this paragraph, Jung talks here of divine love - of the archetypal force taking over consciousness - to manifest in divine love potential. ​ As, consciously,​ we are not able to direct the power of the unconscious libido and where God = love, it must be the archetypal power that shows divine love, not conscious '​human'​ love.  It is not hard then to see how love may be a numinous experience - true love, as it is in its purest form, archetypal and a gift from the unconscious. ​ But, then we must ask with caution, is it coming from the right place...is it a projection?​...hence the comment above about the '​rub',​ Cf. §97.  Other instincts too, power and sex are likely to be closely available...Cf. §102 : some comments on religion and sexuality.</​fc>​ §101 "​...since,​ as a rule, the energy of an archetype is not at the disposal of the conscious mind. ... \\ It is a psychological fact that an archetype can seize hold of the ego and even compel it to act as it - the archetype - wills."​\\ <fc green>In this paragraph, Jung talks here of divine love - of the archetypal force taking over consciousness - to manifest in divine love potential. ​ As, consciously,​ we are not able to direct the power of the unconscious libido and where God = love, it must be the archetypal power that shows divine love, not conscious '​human'​ love.  It is not hard then to see how love may be a numinous experience - true love, as it is in its purest form, archetypal and a gift from the unconscious. ​ But, then we must ask with caution, is it coming from the right place...is it a projection?​...hence the comment above about the '​rub',​ Cf. §97.  Other instincts too, power and sex are likely to be closely available...Cf. §102 : some comments on religion and sexuality.</​fc>​
  
-[[aker:​Religion|Σ]] §102 <fc green>​The discussion takes an interesting turn here off the segue of sexuality and the driving force of these instinctual powers, the libido. ​ Region in much of its guise has been - with divine love that is followed closely, as we've seen by sex and power instincts - to release us from these compulsions. ​ Here Jung draws on the early mysteries and the religious intentions of Christianity and Mithraism. ​ Some interesting footnotes too then... </​fc>​\\ "These religions strove after precisely that higher form of social intercourse symbolised by a projected ("​incarnate"​) idea (the Logos <fc green>​[Cf. §99]</​fc>​),​ whereby all the strongest impulses of man - which formerly had flung him from one passion to another and seemed to the ancients like the compulsion of evil stars, //​[[wp>​Heimarmene|Heimarmene]]//,<​fc red><​sup>​51</​sup></​fc>​ or like what we psychologists would call the //​compulsion of libido// <fc red><​sup>​52</​sup></​fc>​ - could be made available for the maintenance of society."​\\ <fc red><​sup>​51</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Cf. the prayers of the so-called Mithras liturgy ... **//​Altogether,​ the purpose of the mysteries (pl. IVb) was to break the "​compulsion of the stars" by magic power//​**.</​sub>​\\ <fc red><​sup>​52</​sup></​fc><​sub>​The power of fate makes itself felt unpleasantly only when everything goes against our will, that is to say, when we are no longer in harmony with ourselves. ​ The ancients, accordingly,​ brought [[aker:​greek_words#​είμαρμένη|είμαρμένη]] into relation with the "​primal light" or "​primal fire", the Stoic conception of the ultimate cause, or all-pervading warmth which produced everything and is therefore fate. ... This warmth, as will be shown later, is a libido-image...Another conception of [[wp>​Ananke|Ananke]] (Necessity),​ according to Zoroaster'​s book ΙΙερί Φύσεως ("On Nature"​),​ is air, which in the form of wind is again connected with the fertilizing agent.</​sub>​+[[aker:​Religion|Σ]] §102 <fc green>​The discussion takes an interesting turn here off the segue of sexuality and the driving force of these instinctual powers, the libido. ​ Region in much of its guise has been - with divine love that is followed closely, as we've seen by sex and power instincts - to release us from these compulsions. ​ Here Jung draws on the early mysteries and the religious intentions of Christianity and Mithraism. ​ Some interesting footnotes too then... </​fc>​\\ "These religions strove after precisely that higher form of social intercourse symbolised by a projected ("​incarnate"​) idea (the Logos <fc green>​[Cf. §99]</​fc>​),​ whereby all the strongest impulses of man - which formerly had flung him from one passion to another and seemed to the ancients like the compulsion of evil stars, //​[[wp>​Heimarmene|Heimarmene]]//,<​fc red><​sup>​51</​sup></​fc>​ or like what we psychologists would call the //​compulsion of libido// <fc red><​sup>​52</​sup></​fc>​ - could be made available for the maintenance of society."​\\ <fc red><​sup>​51</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Cf. the prayers of the so-called Mithras liturgy ... **//​Altogether,​ the purpose of the mysteries (pl. IVb) was to break the "​compulsion of the stars" by magic power//​**.</​sub>​\\ <fc red><​sup>​52</​sup></​fc><​sub>​The power of fate makes itself felt unpleasantly only when everything goes against our will, that is to say, when we are no longer in harmony with ourselves. ​ The ancients, accordingly,​ brought [[:​greek_words#​είμαρμένη|είμαρμένη]] into relation with the "​primal light" or "​primal fire", the Stoic conception of the ultimate cause, or all-pervading warmth which produced everything and is therefore fate. ... This warmth, as will be shown later, is a libido-image...Another conception of [[wp>​Ananke|Ananke]] (Necessity),​ according to Zoroaster'​s book ΙΙερί Φύσεως ("On Nature"​),​ is air, which in the form of wind is again connected with the fertilizing agent.</​sub>​
  
-[[aker:​Religion|Σ]] §104 <fc green>​latching on to an Idea greater than oneself, a [[aker:​greek_words#​μεσίτης|μεσίτης]] = mediator. (It seems to me, even in footnote 57, quoting Augustine'​ //​Confessions//,​ that a lot of this need was to overcome the basic carnal instinct that had man living in '​licentiousness'​ as Jung put it.) ...sex was becoming a problem :) ...or as Jung puts it: </​fc>​\\ "The meaning of these cults - Christianity and Mithraism - is clear: moral subjugation of the animal instincts.<​fc red><​sup>​58</​sup></​fc>"​ <fc green>​Cf. this with footnote 51, "​Altogether,​ the purpose of the mysteries (pl. IVb) was to break the "​compulsion of the stars" by magic power" </​fc>​\\ ... "The civilized man of today seems very far from that.  He has merely become neurotic. ​ For us the needs of the Christian community have gone by the board; we no longer understand their meaning. ​ We do not even know against what it is meant to protect us.<fc red><​sup>​59</​sup></​fc>"​\\ ..."​For enlightened people, the need for religion is next door to neurosis.<​fc red><​sup>​60</​sup></​fc> ​ It must be admitted that the Christian emphasis on spirit inevitably leads to an unbearable depreciation of man's physical side, and thus produces a sort of optimistic caricature of human nature. ..."\\ <fc red><​sup>​60</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Unfortunately Freud, too, has made himself guilty of this error.</​sub>​\\ <fc green>​i.e. For many people, those who '​need'​ religion are consequently thought to live side-by-side to neuroticism,​ are themselves neurotic.</​fc>​+[[aker:​Religion|Σ]] §104 <fc green>​latching on to an Idea greater than oneself, a [[:​greek_words#​μεσίτης|μεσίτης]] = mediator. (It seems to me, even in footnote 57, quoting Augustine'​ //​Confessions//,​ that a lot of this need was to overcome the basic carnal instinct that had man living in '​licentiousness'​ as Jung put it.) ...sex was becoming a problem :) ...or as Jung puts it: </​fc>​\\ "The meaning of these cults - Christianity and Mithraism - is clear: moral subjugation of the animal instincts.<​fc red><​sup>​58</​sup></​fc>"​ <fc green>​Cf. this with footnote 51, "​Altogether,​ the purpose of the mysteries (pl. IVb) was to break the "​compulsion of the stars" by magic power" </​fc>​\\ ... "The civilized man of today seems very far from that.  He has merely become neurotic. ​ For us the needs of the Christian community have gone by the board; we no longer understand their meaning. ​ We do not even know against what it is meant to protect us.<fc red><​sup>​59</​sup></​fc>"​\\ ..."​For enlightened people, the need for religion is next door to neurosis.<​fc red><​sup>​60</​sup></​fc> ​ It must be admitted that the Christian emphasis on spirit inevitably leads to an unbearable depreciation of man's physical side, and thus produces a sort of optimistic caricature of human nature. ..."\\ <fc red><​sup>​60</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Unfortunately Freud, too, has made himself guilty of this error.</​sub>​\\ <fc green>​i.e. For many people, those who '​need'​ religion are consequently thought to live side-by-side to neuroticism,​ are themselves neurotic.</​fc>​
  
 §106 <fc green>​For modern man,</​fc>​ "​...religion and its prime object - original sin - have mostly vanished into the unconscious."​\\ ​ ..."​The //​unconscious//​ conversion of instinctual impulses into religious activity is ethically worthless, and often no more than an hysterical outburst, even though its products may be aesthetically valuable. ​ Ethical decision is possible only when one is conscious of the conflict in all its aspects. <fc green>(A brief interjection here - what about Oedipus then?​)</​fc> ​ The same is true of the religious attitude: it must be fully conscious of itself and of its foundations if it is to signify anything more than unconscious imitation.<​fc red><​sup>​61</​sup></​fc>"​ §106 <fc green>​For modern man,</​fc>​ "​...religion and its prime object - original sin - have mostly vanished into the unconscious."​\\ ​ ..."​The //​unconscious//​ conversion of instinctual impulses into religious activity is ethically worthless, and often no more than an hysterical outburst, even though its products may be aesthetically valuable. ​ Ethical decision is possible only when one is conscious of the conflict in all its aspects. <fc green>(A brief interjection here - what about Oedipus then?​)</​fc> ​ The same is true of the religious attitude: it must be fully conscious of itself and of its foundations if it is to signify anything more than unconscious imitation.<​fc red><​sup>​61</​sup></​fc>"​
Line 268: Line 268:
  
 §154 "These and other experiences like them were sufficient to give me a clue: it is not a question of a specifically racial heredity, but of a universally human characteristic. ​ Nor is it a question of //inherited ideas//, but of a functional disposition to produce the same, or very similar, ideas. ​ This disposition I later called the //​archetype//​.<​fc red><​sup>​53</​sup></​fc>"​\\ ​ §154 "These and other experiences like them were sufficient to give me a clue: it is not a question of a specifically racial heredity, but of a universally human characteristic. ​ Nor is it a question of //inherited ideas//, but of a functional disposition to produce the same, or very similar, ideas. ​ This disposition I later called the //​archetype//​.<​fc red><​sup>​53</​sup></​fc>"​\\ ​
-<fc red><​sup>​53</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Further material in my " [[aker:collected_works:​cw9i#​the_psychology_of_the_child_archetype|Psychology of the Child Archetype]]"​ and my " [[aker:collected_works:​cw8#​on_the_nature_of_the_psyche_343_-_442|On the Nature of the Psyche]]"​ (1954/55 edn., pp. 401ff.)</​sub>​+<fc red><​sup>​53</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Further material in my " [[collected_works:​cw9i#​the_psychology_of_the_child_archetype|Psychology of the Child Archetype]]"​ and my " [[collected_works:​cw8#​on_the_nature_of_the_psyche_343_-_442|On the Nature of the Psyche]]"​ (1954/55 edn., pp. 401ff.)</​sub>​
  
 <fc green>​Just an interesting note: </​fc>​§155 "The bull is a notorious fertility-symbol."​ <fc green>​Just an interesting note: </​fc>​§155 "The bull is a notorious fertility-symbol."​
  
-<fc green>​There'​s an interesting quote from Johannine Apocalypse'​ vision where he talks of seeing the Son of man, </​fc>​§156 "And he had in his right hand seven stars:<​fc red><​sup>​57</​sup></​fc>​ and out of his mouth went a sharp two-edged sword<fc red><​sup>​58</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​57</​sup></​fc><​sub>​ [[wp>​Ursa Major|The Great Bear]] <fc green>​(Constellation)</​fc>​ consists of seven stars.</​sub>​\\ <fc red><​sup>​58</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Mithras is fequently represented with a short sword in one hand and a torch in the other (fig. 9).  The sword as sacrificial instrument plays a considerable role in the Mithraic myth and also in Christian symbolism. ​ See my " [[aker:collected_works:​cw11|Transformation Symbolism in the Mass]],"​ par. 324 (1955/56 edn., p.284).</​sub>​\\ <fc green>​Cf. this with the depictions of Mithras mentioned in the previous paragraphs, plates XXIVa & XL, </​fc>​§155 "...in his right hand he holds "the constellation of the Bear, which moves and turns the heavens round."​\\ <fc green>​Earlier in §155;</​fc>​ "In the Mithraic liturgy, the bull-gods are called //​κνωδακοΦύλακες//,​ '​guardians of the world'​s axis,' who turn the "axle of the wheel of heaven."​\\ <fc green>I mention this as the symbolism unites Mithras, Helios (the sun) and the Son of man.  There'​s more here to read...see the footnotes.</​fc>​+<fc green>​There'​s an interesting quote from Johannine Apocalypse'​ vision where he talks of seeing the Son of man, </​fc>​§156 "And he had in his right hand seven stars:<​fc red><​sup>​57</​sup></​fc>​ and out of his mouth went a sharp two-edged sword<fc red><​sup>​58</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​57</​sup></​fc><​sub>​ [[wp>​Ursa Major|The Great Bear]] <fc green>​(Constellation)</​fc>​ consists of seven stars.</​sub>​\\ <fc red><​sup>​58</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Mithras is fequently represented with a short sword in one hand and a torch in the other (fig. 9).  The sword as sacrificial instrument plays a considerable role in the Mithraic myth and also in Christian symbolism. ​ See my " [[collected_works:​cw11|Transformation Symbolism in the Mass]],"​ par. 324 (1955/56 edn., p.284).</​sub>​\\ <fc green>​Cf. this with the depictions of Mithras mentioned in the previous paragraphs, plates XXIVa & XL, </​fc>​§155 "...in his right hand he holds "the constellation of the Bear, which moves and turns the heavens round."​\\ <fc green>​Earlier in §155;</​fc>​ "In the Mithraic liturgy, the bull-gods are called //​κνωδακοΦύλακες//,​ '​guardians of the world'​s axis,' who turn the "axle of the wheel of heaven."​\\ <fc green>I mention this as the symbolism unites Mithras, Helios (the sun) and the Son of man.  There'​s more here to read...see the footnotes.</​fc>​
  
 §163 <fc green>​Goes into more detail about sun worship and Christianity. ​ The twelve apostles for e.g. being likened to the twelve signs of the zodiac and the suns course through the zodiac (cf. footnote72, p107). ​ There is also a nice point (and Fig.10 on p108) about the serpent/​snake depicting the course of the moon and/or sun across the sky carrying 'the signs of the zodiac on its back'​.\\ Here too, Christ is likened with the serpent (in paradise). ​ Interesting footnote 75, p108,</​fc>​ ""​To the great God Zeus Helios, King Jesus" (p. 166, §22)."​ <fc green>​taken from a manuscript "​Report on the Happenings in Persia,"​ from 11th century. ​ See footnote for reference.</​fc>​ §163 <fc green>​Goes into more detail about sun worship and Christianity. ​ The twelve apostles for e.g. being likened to the twelve signs of the zodiac and the suns course through the zodiac (cf. footnote72, p107). ​ There is also a nice point (and Fig.10 on p108) about the serpent/​snake depicting the course of the moon and/or sun across the sky carrying 'the signs of the zodiac on its back'​.\\ Here too, Christ is likened with the serpent (in paradise). ​ Interesting footnote 75, p108,</​fc>​ ""​To the great God Zeus Helios, King Jesus" (p. 166, §22)."​ <fc green>​taken from a manuscript "​Report on the Happenings in Persia,"​ from 11th century. ​ See footnote for reference.</​fc>​
Line 280: Line 280:
 §165 "The forces of nature are always two-faced ..." <fc green>​(Beneficent and destroying)</​fc>​ §165 "The forces of nature are always two-faced ..." <fc green>​(Beneficent and destroying)</​fc>​
  
-[[aker:​collected_works:​malpaper1|Λ]] <fc green>​The moth and the **//sun//** is what Jung was discussing previously from the title of Miss Miller'​ poem, and now he brings in the with the moth and the **//​flame//​**. ​ The latter part of this paragraph has some interesting points related to the two sides of nature and the two sides of fate;</​fc>​\\ ​ §165 ""​The Moth and the Flame" could easily have the hackneyed meaning of lying round the flame of passion until one's wings are burned. ​ This passionate longing has two sides: it is the power which beautifies everything, but, in a different set of circumstances,​ is quite as likely to destroy everything. ...  All passion is a challenge to fate ... Fear of fate is a very understandable phenomenon, for it <fc green>​(fate)</​fc>​ is incalculable,​ immeasurable,​ full of unknown dangers. The perpetual hesitation of the neurotic to launch out into life is readily explained by his desire to stand aside so as not to get involved in the dangerous struggle for existence. ​ But anyone who refuses to experience life must stifle his desire to live - in other words, he must commit partial suicide. ​ This explains the death-fantasies that usually accompany the renunciation of desire."​+[[MalPaper1|Λ]] <fc green>​The moth and the **//sun//** is what Jung was discussing previously from the title of Miss Miller'​ poem, and now he brings in the with the moth and the **//​flame//​**. ​ The latter part of this paragraph has some interesting points related to the two sides of nature and the two sides of fate;</​fc>​\\ ​ §165 ""​The Moth and the Flame" could easily have the hackneyed meaning of lying round the flame of passion until one's wings are burned. ​ This passionate longing has two sides: it is the power which beautifies everything, but, in a different set of circumstances,​ is quite as likely to destroy everything. ...  All passion is a challenge to fate ... Fear of fate is a very understandable phenomenon, for it <fc green>​(fate)</​fc>​ is incalculable,​ immeasurable,​ full of unknown dangers. The perpetual hesitation of the neurotic to launch out into life is readily explained by his desire to stand aside so as not to get involved in the dangerous struggle for existence. ​ But anyone who refuses to experience life must stifle his desire to live - in other words, he must commit partial suicide. ​ This explains the death-fantasies that usually accompany the renunciation of desire."​
  
 <fc green>​This makes me think of Faust, when he meets  Want, Blame, Need & Care...</​fc>​ <fc green>​This makes me think of Faust, when he meets  Want, Blame, Need & Care...</​fc>​
Line 308: Line 308:
  
 <fc green>In talking of the Tom Thumb images, he says they are //​symbols//,​ not signs:</​fc>​\\ ​ <fc green>In talking of the Tom Thumb images, he says they are //​symbols//,​ not signs:</​fc>​\\ ​
-§180 "A symbol is an indefinite expression with many meaning, pointing to something not easily defined and therefore not fully known. ...The symbol therefore has a large number of analogous variants, and the more of these variants it has at its disposal, the more complete and clear-cut will be the image it projects of its object."​\\ "Thus the //creative dwarfs// toil away in secret; the //​phallus//,​ also working in darkness, begets a living being; and the //key// unlocks the mysterious forbidden door behind which some wonderful thing awaits discovery."​ <fc green>​Interesting segue to the '​key'​...?​ Ahhh - ok, so in this context the //key// that Mephistopheles '​gives'​ to Faust is the Phallus that '​increases in my hand', Cf footnote 7, p125</​fc>​\\ <fc red><​sup>​7</​sup></​fc><​sub>​The light symbolism in the etymology of [[aker:​greek_words#​Φαλλός|Φαλλός]] <fc green>​(phallus)</​fc>​ is discussed in pars. 321f., below.</​sub>​+§180 "A symbol is an indefinite expression with many meaning, pointing to something not easily defined and therefore not fully known. ...The symbol therefore has a large number of analogous variants, and the more of these variants it has at its disposal, the more complete and clear-cut will be the image it projects of its object."​\\ "Thus the //creative dwarfs// toil away in secret; the //​phallus//,​ also working in darkness, begets a living being; and the //key// unlocks the mysterious forbidden door behind which some wonderful thing awaits discovery."​ <fc green>​Interesting segue to the '​key'​...?​ Ahhh - ok, so in this context the //key// that Mephistopheles '​gives'​ to Faust is the Phallus that '​increases in my hand', Cf footnote 7, p125</​fc>​\\ <fc red><​sup>​7</​sup></​fc><​sub>​The light symbolism in the etymology of [[:​greek_words#​Φαλλός|Φαλλός]] <fc green>​(phallus)</​fc>​ is discussed in pars. 321f., below.</​sub>​
  
 <fc green>I like this quote from Faust, that Jung relates to the libido: </fc> <fc green>I like this quote from Faust, that Jung relates to the libido: </fc>
Line 335: Line 335:
 §186 <fc green>​Jung discusses here the words '​want'​ or '​wish'​ and '​desire'​ in the context of a quote from Cicero. ​ I like the etymology of the word desire - which has nothing to do with the discussion, but thought I'd put it down anyway :) </fc> \\ <fc blue>​desire (v.) : early 13c., from O.Fr. desirrer (12c.) "wish, desire, long for," from L. desiderare "long for, wish for; demand, expect,"​ original sense perhaps "await what the stars will bring,"​ from the phrase de sidere "from the stars,"​ from sidus (gen. sideris) "​heavenly body, star, constellation"​ (but see consider). Related: Desired; desiring. The noun is attested from c.1300, from O.Fr. desir, from desirer; sense of "​lust"​ is first recorded mid-14c.</​fc>​\\ <fc green>In particular, I like the bit about "from the stars" ...to seek in the stars but not to find I heard once.  I like that.  \\ There is a nice quote from St. Augustine too.</​fc>​ §186 <fc green>​Jung discusses here the words '​want'​ or '​wish'​ and '​desire'​ in the context of a quote from Cicero. ​ I like the etymology of the word desire - which has nothing to do with the discussion, but thought I'd put it down anyway :) </fc> \\ <fc blue>​desire (v.) : early 13c., from O.Fr. desirrer (12c.) "wish, desire, long for," from L. desiderare "long for, wish for; demand, expect,"​ original sense perhaps "await what the stars will bring,"​ from the phrase de sidere "from the stars,"​ from sidus (gen. sideris) "​heavenly body, star, constellation"​ (but see consider). Related: Desired; desiring. The noun is attested from c.1300, from O.Fr. desir, from desirer; sense of "​lust"​ is first recorded mid-14c.</​fc>​\\ <fc green>In particular, I like the bit about "from the stars" ...to seek in the stars but not to find I heard once.  I like that.  \\ There is a nice quote from St. Augustine too.</​fc>​
  
-§189 "We can say, then, that the concept of libido in psychology has functionally the same significance as the concept of energy in physics since the time of Robert Mayer.<​fc red><​sup>​32</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​32</​sup></​fc><​sub>​See my " [[aker:collected_works:​cw8|On Psychic Energy]]"​ <fc green>​(in CW8)</​fc>​ (Swiss edn., pp. 36ff.).</​sub>​+§189 "We can say, then, that the concept of libido in psychology has functionally the same significance as the concept of energy in physics since the time of Robert Mayer.<​fc red><​sup>​32</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​32</​sup></​fc><​sub>​See my " [[collected_works:​cw8|On Psychic Energy]]"​ <fc green>​(in CW8)</​fc>​ (Swiss edn., pp. 36ff.).</​sub>​
  
 [[#top|back to top]] [[#top|back to top]]
Line 346: Line 346:
 §194 <fc green>​Jung gets a little liberal and cursory here I reckon with his justification as he touches on evolution and how instincts derived from a common denominator,​ for e.g. in the evolutionary chain the first instinct was no doubt to pro-create, hence, the reproductive instinct : </​fc>"​Thus,​ many complex functions, which today must be denied all trace of sexuality, were originally derived from the reproductive instinct."​ <fc green>​...and then again, a bold comment I think </​fc>"​Although there can be no doubt that music originally belonged to the reproductive sphere, it would be an unjustified and fantastic generalisation to put music in the same category as sex." <fc green>​This is very bold I think - does this mean, that somewhere in the evolutionary path a process of "??'​ occurred to take something of an instinctual nature to something of an artistic nature?​...what could that be?  Perhaps he explains further on.</​fc>​ §194 <fc green>​Jung gets a little liberal and cursory here I reckon with his justification as he touches on evolution and how instincts derived from a common denominator,​ for e.g. in the evolutionary chain the first instinct was no doubt to pro-create, hence, the reproductive instinct : </​fc>"​Thus,​ many complex functions, which today must be denied all trace of sexuality, were originally derived from the reproductive instinct."​ <fc green>​...and then again, a bold comment I think </​fc>"​Although there can be no doubt that music originally belonged to the reproductive sphere, it would be an unjustified and fantastic generalisation to put music in the same category as sex." <fc green>​This is very bold I think - does this mean, that somewhere in the evolutionary path a process of "??'​ occurred to take something of an instinctual nature to something of an artistic nature?​...what could that be?  Perhaps he explains further on.</​fc>​
  
-<fc green>​There'​s an interesting quote from Freud that I think worth mentioning that reminds me of //[[aker:collected_works:​cw8|On the Nature of Psyche]]// in CW8 - instinct and soma : </​fc>​\\ "We regard instinct as being a term situated on the frontier-line between the somatic and the mental, and consider it as denoting the mental representative of organic forces. .... <fc red><​sup>​6</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​6</​sup></​fc><​sub>"​Notes on a Case of Paranoia,"​ pp.460ff.</​sub>​ \\ <fc green>​Sounds a lot like Jung here I think.</​fc>​+<fc green>​There'​s an interesting quote from Freud that I think worth mentioning that reminds me of //​[[collected_works:​cw8|On the Nature of Psyche]]// in CW8 - instinct and soma : </​fc>​\\ "We regard instinct as being a term situated on the frontier-line between the somatic and the mental, and consider it as denoting the mental representative of organic forces. .... <fc red><​sup>​6</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​6</​sup></​fc><​sub>"​Notes on a Case of Paranoia,"​ pp.460ff.</​sub>​ \\ <fc green>​Sounds a lot like Jung here I think.</​fc>​
  
 §195 "Thus far our conception of libido coincides with Schopenhauer'​s Will, inasmuch as a movement perceived from outside can only be grasped as the manifestation of an inner will or desire."​ <fc green>​Getting philosophical now...philosophically speaking this is "​introjection"​.</​fc>​ "... Similarly, the concept of libido as desire or appetite is an //​interpretation//​ of the process of psychic energy, which we experience precisely in the form of an appetite. ​ We know as little about what underlies it as we know about what the psyche is //per se//." <fc green>​Things get a little hairy here as Jung points out we have no idea about psychic energy or libido, we only know how we experience, and thus, //​interpret//​ it. </fc> §195 "Thus far our conception of libido coincides with Schopenhauer'​s Will, inasmuch as a movement perceived from outside can only be grasped as the manifestation of an inner will or desire."​ <fc green>​Getting philosophical now...philosophically speaking this is "​introjection"​.</​fc>​ "... Similarly, the concept of libido as desire or appetite is an //​interpretation//​ of the process of psychic energy, which we experience precisely in the form of an appetite. ​ We know as little about what underlies it as we know about what the psyche is //per se//." <fc green>​Things get a little hairy here as Jung points out we have no idea about psychic energy or libido, we only know how we experience, and thus, //​interpret//​ it. </fc>
Line 441: Line 441:
 §242 <fc green> [[wp>​Diotima of Mantinea|Diotima]] and her description of Eros. </fc> §242 <fc green> [[wp>​Diotima of Mantinea|Diotima]] and her description of Eros. </fc>
  
-[[aker:Alchemy|Δ]] §245 "The fiery furnace, like the fiery tripod in //Faust//, is a mother-symbol. ... The alchemical [[wp>​Athanor|athanor]],​ or melting-pot,​ signifies the body, while the alembic or //​cucurbita//,​ the Hermetic vessel, represents the uterus."​+[[:alchemy|Δ]] §245 "The fiery furnace, like the fiery tripod in //Faust//, is a mother-symbol. ... The alchemical [[wp>​Athanor|athanor]],​ or melting-pot,​ signifies the body, while the alembic or //​cucurbita//,​ the Hermetic vessel, represents the uterus."​
  
 §246 "Soma and fire are identical in Vedic literature. ​ The ancient Hindus saw fire both as a symbol of Agni and as an emanation of the inner libido-fire,​ ..."\\ <fc green>​Cf. end of §315.</​fc>​ §246 "Soma and fire are identical in Vedic literature. ​ The ancient Hindus saw fire both as a symbol of Agni and as an emanation of the inner libido-fire,​ ..."\\ <fc green>​Cf. end of §315.</​fc>​
Line 474: Line 474:
 <fc green>​§258 - Jung doesn'​t care for the philosophy of Schopenhauer,​ Carus, and von Hartmann much its seems. ​ Equating them with the interpretation of the undifferentiated unconscious content. ​ A more differentiated,​ different view only arises, he says, through individuation. ​ So these guys were basically stuck.</​fc>​ <fc green>​§258 - Jung doesn'​t care for the philosophy of Schopenhauer,​ Carus, and von Hartmann much its seems. ​ Equating them with the interpretation of the undifferentiated unconscious content. ​ A more differentiated,​ different view only arises, he says, through individuation. ​ So these guys were basically stuck.</​fc>​
  
-§258 "The unconscious consists, among other things, of remnants of the undifferentiated archaic psyche, including its animal stages."​ <fc green>​Cf. [[aker:collected_works:​cw8|CW8 - Nature of the Psyche]] </fc>+§258 "The unconscious consists, among other things, of remnants of the undifferentiated archaic psyche, including its animal stages."​ <fc green>​Cf. [[collected_works:​cw8|CW8 - Nature of the Psyche]] </fc>
  
 <fc green>I get the feeling that this next comment underpins much if not all of Jung's view on Psychology - one of the key reasons for studying the unconscious as opposed to the individual cases of consciousness,​ and the conscious individual. ​ But rather, to view consciousness as the adaptation of the unconscious content, and most of all, to understand the unconscious.</​fc>​\\ ​ <fc green>I get the feeling that this next comment underpins much if not all of Jung's view on Psychology - one of the key reasons for studying the unconscious as opposed to the individual cases of consciousness,​ and the conscious individual. ​ But rather, to view consciousness as the adaptation of the unconscious content, and most of all, to understand the unconscious.</​fc>​\\ ​
Line 495: Line 495:
  
 §262 "There are two main reasons why these instinctual impulses are unconscious:​ <fc green>​(1)</​fc>​ the first is the general unconsciousness which we all share to a greater or less degree; <fc green>​(2)</​fc>​ the other is a secondary unconsciousness due to the repression of incompatible contents. ..."​\\ ​ §262 "There are two main reasons why these instinctual impulses are unconscious:​ <fc green>​(1)</​fc>​ the first is the general unconsciousness which we all share to a greater or less degree; <fc green>​(2)</​fc>​ the other is a secondary unconsciousness due to the repression of incompatible contents. ..."​\\ ​
-§263 "​Repression,​ as we have seen, is not directed solely against sexuality, but against the instincts in general, which are the vital foundations,​ the laws governing all life." <fc green>​Cf. [[aker:collected_works:​cw8|CW8 - Nature of the Psyche]] </fc> "The regression caused by repressing the instincts always leads back to the psychic past, and consequently to the phase of childhood where the decisive factors appear to be, and sometimes actually are, the parents."​ <fc green>​Cf. §199, §92 & §134</​fc>​+§263 "​Repression,​ as we have seen, is not directed solely against sexuality, but against the instincts in general, which are the vital foundations,​ the laws governing all life." <fc green>​Cf. [[collected_works:​cw8|CW8 - Nature of the Psyche]] </fc> "The regression caused by repressing the instincts always leads back to the psychic past, and consequently to the phase of childhood where the decisive factors appear to be, and sometimes actually are, the parents."​ <fc green>​Cf. §199, §92 & §134</​fc>​
  
 §264 "If the regression goes still further back, beyond the phase of childhood to the preconscious,​ prenatal phase, then archetypal images appear, no longer connected with the individual'​s memories, but belonging to the stock of inherited //​possibilities of representation//​ that are born anew in every individual."​ <fc green>We are all born with the same - 'born anew' - blueprint of archetypal content. ​ However, has this content evolved, developed, been contributed to...it isn't clear here.  Although in the previous paragraphs, Cf. §259, it would seem it has developed over time, from the first human. ​ So then, the collective unconscious must be something that we all contribute to over time in some way if we can venture there and in some way dialogue with it.  Most people do not though.</​fc>​\\ <fc green>​This is just interesting and noteworthy: </​fc>​\\ "It frequently happens that if the attitude towards the parents is too affectionate and too dependent, it is compensated in dreams by frightening animals, who represent the parents just as much as the helpful animals did."​\\ <fc green>​Jung makes some very interesting comments here about Oedipus and his impression / confrontation with the devouring mother in the form of the Sphinx - if we recall that the person who could confront and solve the riddle of the Sphinx won for them the hand of the Queen, Jocasta, his mother. </fc> "This had all those tragic consequences which could easily have been avoided if only Oedipus had been sufficiently intimidated by the frightening appearance of the "​terrible"​ or "​devouring"​ Mother whom the Sphinx personified."​ <fc green>I find this very interesting,​ especially Jung's view and focus - in this paragraph at least - on the Sphinx and the riddle as the antecedent to all these troubles. ​ Well, not exactly, but certainly as a key in Oedipus'​ journey.</​fc>​ "​Little did he <fc green>​(Oedipus)</​fc>​ know that the riddle of the Sphinx can never be solved merely by the wit of man." §264 "If the regression goes still further back, beyond the phase of childhood to the preconscious,​ prenatal phase, then archetypal images appear, no longer connected with the individual'​s memories, but belonging to the stock of inherited //​possibilities of representation//​ that are born anew in every individual."​ <fc green>We are all born with the same - 'born anew' - blueprint of archetypal content. ​ However, has this content evolved, developed, been contributed to...it isn't clear here.  Although in the previous paragraphs, Cf. §259, it would seem it has developed over time, from the first human. ​ So then, the collective unconscious must be something that we all contribute to over time in some way if we can venture there and in some way dialogue with it.  Most people do not though.</​fc>​\\ <fc green>​This is just interesting and noteworthy: </​fc>​\\ "It frequently happens that if the attitude towards the parents is too affectionate and too dependent, it is compensated in dreams by frightening animals, who represent the parents just as much as the helpful animals did."​\\ <fc green>​Jung makes some very interesting comments here about Oedipus and his impression / confrontation with the devouring mother in the form of the Sphinx - if we recall that the person who could confront and solve the riddle of the Sphinx won for them the hand of the Queen, Jocasta, his mother. </fc> "This had all those tragic consequences which could easily have been avoided if only Oedipus had been sufficiently intimidated by the frightening appearance of the "​terrible"​ or "​devouring"​ Mother whom the Sphinx personified."​ <fc green>I find this very interesting,​ especially Jung's view and focus - in this paragraph at least - on the Sphinx and the riddle as the antecedent to all these troubles. ​ Well, not exactly, but certainly as a key in Oedipus'​ journey.</​fc>​ "​Little did he <fc green>​(Oedipus)</​fc>​ know that the riddle of the Sphinx can never be solved merely by the wit of man."
Line 510: Line 510:
  
 §268 <fc green>​Jung discusses her briefly the crown, Cf. p88, footnote. ​ A noteworthy footnote 18...</​fc>​\\ ​ §268 <fc green>​Jung discusses her briefly the crown, Cf. p88, footnote. ​ A noteworthy footnote 18...</​fc>​\\ ​
-<fc red><​sup>​16</​sup></​fc><​sub>​... The crown also plays a role in alchemy, perhaps as a result of cabalistic influence. ... The hermaphrodite is generally represented as crowned (pl. XVIII). ​ I have put together the alchemical material on the crown in my //[[aker:collected_works:​cw14|Mysterium Coniunctionis]]//​. </​sub>​+<fc red><​sup>​16</​sup></​fc><​sub>​... The crown also plays a role in alchemy, perhaps as a result of cabalistic influence. ... The hermaphrodite is generally represented as crowned (pl. XVIII). ​ I have put together the alchemical material on the crown in my //​[[collected_works:​cw14|Mysterium Coniunctionis]]//​. </​sub>​
  
 §272 "The mother'​s influence is mainly on the Eros of her son, therefore it was only logical that Oedipus should end up by marrying his mother. ​ But the father exerts his influence on the mind or spirit of his daughter - on her "​Logos.""​ §272 "The mother'​s influence is mainly on the Eros of her son, therefore it was only logical that Oedipus should end up by marrying his mother. ​ But the father exerts his influence on the mind or spirit of his daughter - on her "​Logos.""​
Line 533: Line 533:
  
 <fc green>​p199</​fc>​\\ ​ <fc green>​p199</​fc>​\\ ​
-<fc red><​sup>​49</​sup></​fc><​sub>​... The rapid growth of the hero, a recurrent motif, seems to indicate that the birth and apparent childhood of the hero are extraordinary because his birth is really a rebirth, for which reason he is able to adapt so quickly to his heroic role.  For a more detailed interpretation of the Khidr legend, see my paper [[aker:collected_works:​cw9i|Concerning Rebirth]] CW 9i, (Swiss edn., pp. 73ff.).</​sub>​+<fc red><​sup>​49</​sup></​fc><​sub>​... The rapid growth of the hero, a recurrent motif, seems to indicate that the birth and apparent childhood of the hero are extraordinary because his birth is really a rebirth, for which reason he is able to adapt so quickly to his heroic role.  For a more detailed interpretation of the Khidr legend, see my paper [[collected_works:​cw9i|Concerning Rebirth]] CW 9i, (Swiss edn., pp. 73ff.).</​sub>​
  
 <fc green> **[[wp>​Castor and Pollux|Dioscuri]]** (from wikipedia): In Greek and Roman mythology, Castor ( /​ˈkæstər/;​ Latin: Castōr; Greek: Κάστωρ,​ Kastōr, "​beaver"​) and Pollux ( /​ˈpɒləks/;​ Latin: Pollūx) or Polydeuces ( /​ˌpɒlɨˈdjuːsiːz/;​ Greek: Πολυδεύκης,​ Poludeukēs,​ "much sweet wine"​[1]) were twin brothers, together known as the Dioscuri ( /​daɪˈɒskjəraɪ/;​ Latin: Dioscūrī; Greek: Διόσκουροι,​ Dioskouroi, "sons of Zeus"​). ​ Their mother was Leda, but Castor was the mortal son of Tyndareus, king of Sparta, and Pollux the divine son of Zeus, who visited Leda in the guise of a swan. Though accounts of their birth are varied, they are sometimes said to have been born from an egg, along with their twin sisters Helen of Troy and Clytemnestra.</​fc>​ <fc green> **[[wp>​Castor and Pollux|Dioscuri]]** (from wikipedia): In Greek and Roman mythology, Castor ( /​ˈkæstər/;​ Latin: Castōr; Greek: Κάστωρ,​ Kastōr, "​beaver"​) and Pollux ( /​ˈpɒləks/;​ Latin: Pollūx) or Polydeuces ( /​ˌpɒlɨˈdjuːsiːz/;​ Greek: Πολυδεύκης,​ Poludeukēs,​ "much sweet wine"​[1]) were twin brothers, together known as the Dioscuri ( /​daɪˈɒskjəraɪ/;​ Latin: Dioscūrī; Greek: Διόσκουροι,​ Dioskouroi, "sons of Zeus"​). ​ Their mother was Leda, but Castor was the mortal son of Tyndareus, king of Sparta, and Pollux the divine son of Zeus, who visited Leda in the guise of a swan. Though accounts of their birth are varied, they are sometimes said to have been born from an egg, along with their twin sisters Helen of Troy and Clytemnestra.</​fc>​
Line 570: Line 570:
  
 Frobenius, //Das Zeitalter des Sonnengottes//,​ p. 421: \\  Frobenius, //Das Zeitalter des Sonnengottes//,​ p. 421: \\ 
-{{ :aker:collected_works:​nightseajourney.jpg | The night sea journey}}+{{ collected_works:​nightseajourney.jpg | The night sea journey}}
  
 [[aker:​Religion|Σ]] §312 "The meaning of this cycle of myths is clear enough; it is the longing to attain rebirth through a return to the womb, and to become immortal like the sun.  This longing for the mother is amply expressed in the literature of the Bible."​ [[aker:​Religion|Σ]] §312 "The meaning of this cycle of myths is clear enough; it is the longing to attain rebirth through a return to the womb, and to become immortal like the sun.  This longing for the mother is amply expressed in the literature of the Bible."​
Line 595: Line 595:
 §319 <fc green>​Much mention here about water as the giver of life and then he touches on death and life briefly.</​fc>​ "The maternal significance of water (pl. XXVI) is one of the clearest interpretations of symbols in the whole field of mythology.<​fc red><​sup>​17</​sup></​fc>​ ... Those black waters of death <fc green>​(The Styx)</​fc>​ are the water of life, for death ... is the maternal womb, just as the sea devours the sun but brings it forth again."​ §319 <fc green>​Much mention here about water as the giver of life and then he touches on death and life briefly.</​fc>​ "The maternal significance of water (pl. XXVI) is one of the clearest interpretations of symbols in the whole field of mythology.<​fc red><​sup>​17</​sup></​fc>​ ... Those black waters of death <fc green>​(The Styx)</​fc>​ are the water of life, for death ... is the maternal womb, just as the sea devours the sun but brings it forth again."​
  
-§320 "The projection of the mother-imago upon water endows the latter with a number of numinous or magical qualities peculiar to the mother. ... In dreams and fantasies the sea or a large expanse of water signifies the unconscious. ​ The maternal aspect of water coincides with the //nature of the unconscious//,​ because the latter (particularly in men) can be regarded as the mother or matrix of consciousness. ​ Hence the unconscious,​ when interpreted on the subjective level,​.<​fc red><​sup>​22</​sup></​fc>​ has the same maternal significance as water."​\\ <fc green>​Emphasis mine</​fc>​\\ .<fc red><​sup>​22</​sup></​fc><​sub>​See my //[[aker:collected_works:​cw6|Psychological Types]]// Def. 52.</​sub>​+§320 "The projection of the mother-imago upon water endows the latter with a number of numinous or magical qualities peculiar to the mother. ... In dreams and fantasies the sea or a large expanse of water signifies the unconscious. ​ The maternal aspect of water coincides with the //nature of the unconscious//,​ because the latter (particularly in men) can be regarded as the mother or matrix of consciousness. ​ Hence the unconscious,​ when interpreted on the subjective level,​.<​fc red><​sup>​22</​sup></​fc>​ has the same maternal significance as water."​\\ <fc green>​Emphasis mine</​fc>​\\ .<fc red><​sup>​22</​sup></​fc><​sub>​See my //​[[collected_works:​cw6|Psychological Types]]// Def. 52.</​sub>​
  
-<fc green> **//The 'tree of life' as a mother symbol//** \\ Cf with [[aker:collected_works:​cw13#​v_the_philosophical_tree_304_-_482|CW13 Alchemical Studies]] - the Philosophical Tree</​fc>​+<fc green> **//The 'tree of life' as a mother symbol//** \\ Cf with [[collected_works:​cw13#​v_the_philosophical_tree_304_-_482|CW13 Alchemical Studies]] - the Philosophical Tree</​fc>​
  
-§321 "​Another equally common mother-symbol is the wood of life ( [[aker:​greek_words#​ξύλον_ζωής|ξύλον ζωής]]),​ or tree of life."+§321 "​Another equally common mother-symbol is the wood of life ( [[:​greek_words#​ξύλον_ζωής|ξύλον ζωής]]),​ or tree of life."
  
  
-<fc green>An interesting side note here that I like to capture when Jung mentions different tree types. ​ Here he mentions, '​Adonis in the myrtle, Osiris in the cedar-tree'​ CF. para. 353.  And also </​fc>"​Hence when Attis castrates himself under a pine-tree, he did so because the tree has a maternal significance. ... <fc red><​sup>​23</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​15</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Cones were sometimes used instead of columns, as in the cults of Aphrodite, Astarte, etc.</​sub>​\\ <fc green>​There'​s more here about '​blocks of wood', '​posts',​ '​columns',​ 'cross post'​...etc. </fc> "The [[aker:​greek_words#​φαλλός|φαλλός]] is a pole, a ceremonial lingam carved out of figwood, as are all the Roman statues of [[wp>​Priapus|Priapus]]."​ <fc green>​Cf. footnote 30 on p221.</​fc>​+<fc green>An interesting side note here that I like to capture when Jung mentions different tree types. ​ Here he mentions, '​Adonis in the myrtle, Osiris in the cedar-tree'​ CF. para. 353.  And also </​fc>"​Hence when Attis castrates himself under a pine-tree, he did so because the tree has a maternal significance. ... <fc red><​sup>​23</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​15</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Cones were sometimes used instead of columns, as in the cults of Aphrodite, Astarte, etc.</​sub>​\\ <fc green>​There'​s more here about '​blocks of wood', '​posts',​ '​columns',​ 'cross post'​...etc. </fc> "The [[:​greek_words#​φαλλός|φαλλός]] is a pole, a ceremonial lingam carved out of figwood, as are all the Roman statues of [[wp>​Priapus|Priapus]]."​ <fc green>​Cf. footnote 30 on p221.</​fc>​
  
 <fc green>An interesting footnote on page 220: </​fc>​\\ ​ <fc green>An interesting footnote on page 220: </​fc>​\\ ​
Line 608: Line 608:
  
 §324 "Not only the gods, but the goddesses, too, are libido-symbols,​ when regarded from the point of view of their dynamism. ​ The libido expresses itself in images of sun, light, fire, sex, fertility, and growth. ​ In this way the goddesses, as we have seen, come to possess phallic symbols, even though the latter are essentially masculine. ​  ...so the male lies hidden in the female.<​fc red><​sup>​28</​sup></​fc>​ ... Thus the tree has a bisexual character, ... <fc red><​sup>​30</​sup></​fc>"​\\ ​ §324 "Not only the gods, but the goddesses, too, are libido-symbols,​ when regarded from the point of view of their dynamism. ​ The libido expresses itself in images of sun, light, fire, sex, fertility, and growth. ​ In this way the goddesses, as we have seen, come to possess phallic symbols, even though the latter are essentially masculine. ​  ...so the male lies hidden in the female.<​fc red><​sup>​28</​sup></​fc>​ ... Thus the tree has a bisexual character, ... <fc red><​sup>​30</​sup></​fc>"​\\ ​
-<fc red><​sup>​28</​sup></​fc><​sub>​ [[aker:collected_works:​cw12|Psychology and Alchemy]], fig. 131, p.245.</​sub>​\\ ​+<fc red><​sup>​28</​sup></​fc><​sub>​ [[collected_works:​cw12|Psychology and Alchemy]], fig. 131, p.245.</​sub>​\\ ​
 <fc red><​sup>​30</​sup></​fc><​sub>​The fig-tree is phallic. ​ It is worth noting that Dionysus planted a fig-tree at the entrance to Hades, in the same way that phalloi were placed on graves. ​ The cypress, sacred to Aphrodite, the Cyprian, became an emblem of death, ​ ... </​sub>​ <fc red><​sup>​30</​sup></​fc><​sub>​The fig-tree is phallic. ​ It is worth noting that Dionysus planted a fig-tree at the entrance to Hades, in the same way that phalloi were placed on graves. ​ The cypress, sacred to Aphrodite, the Cyprian, became an emblem of death, ​ ... </​sub>​
  
Line 689: Line 689:
  
 §365 "The motif of "​devouring"​ (pls. XXXIIb, XXXIV), which Frobinius has shown to be one of the commonest components of the sun myth, is closely connected with the embracing and entwining. ​ The "​whale-dragon"​ always "​devours"​ the hero, but the devouring can also be partial. ..."​\\ ​ §365 "The motif of "​devouring"​ (pls. XXXIIb, XXXIV), which Frobinius has shown to be one of the commonest components of the sun myth, is closely connected with the embracing and entwining. ​ The "​whale-dragon"​ always "​devours"​ the hero, but the devouring can also be partial. ..."​\\ ​
-<fc green>At the end of this paragraph Jung references a dream about a woman'​s foot that is seized by a crab.  This is cross-referenced to his explanation in [[aker:collected_works:​cw7|CW7 "On the Psychology of the Unconscious"​]],​ para. 123ff. </fc>+<fc green>At the end of this paragraph Jung references a dream about a woman'​s foot that is seized by a crab.  This is cross-referenced to his explanation in [[collected_works:​cw7|CW7 "On the Psychology of the Unconscious"​]],​ para. 123ff. </fc>
  
 §367 "The motif of entwining is a mother-symbol.<​fc red><​sup>​72</​sup></​fc> ​ The entwining trees are at the same time birth-giving mothers (cf. pl. XXXXIX), as in the Greek myth where the μελίαι νύμΦαι are ash-trees, the mothers of the men of the Bronze Age." ... "​According to a Nordic myth, God created man by breathing life into a substance called //tre// <fc red><​sup>​73</​sup></​fc>​ (tree, wood).<​fc red><​sup>​74</​sup></​fc>​ ..." <fc green>​There is more mention here of the '​world-ash tree', the 'tree pregnant with death and life', and the '​regenerative function of the world-ash. ​ From an egyptian book there is a reference to 'the tree of emerald green'​... I wonder what that is, if it is a specific tree, or just reference to the tree of life.</​fc>​\\ <fc red><​sup>​72</​sup></​fc><​sub>​This motif also include that of the "​clashing rocks" (Frobenius, p. 405). The hero often has to steer his ship between two rocks that clash together. (A similar idea is that of the biting door or the snapping tree-trunk.) .... This formulation implies that opening the rock is an undertaking that can never be accomplished in reality, it can only be //​wished//​. ​  ... The bird is a symbol of "​wishful thinking."​ <fc green>(I think of the bird, flight, and mans wish to fly...there has always been an eternal gaze of man towards the skies, towards birds that can soar.)</​fc></​sub>​ §367 "The motif of entwining is a mother-symbol.<​fc red><​sup>​72</​sup></​fc> ​ The entwining trees are at the same time birth-giving mothers (cf. pl. XXXXIX), as in the Greek myth where the μελίαι νύμΦαι are ash-trees, the mothers of the men of the Bronze Age." ... "​According to a Nordic myth, God created man by breathing life into a substance called //tre// <fc red><​sup>​73</​sup></​fc>​ (tree, wood).<​fc red><​sup>​74</​sup></​fc>​ ..." <fc green>​There is more mention here of the '​world-ash tree', the 'tree pregnant with death and life', and the '​regenerative function of the world-ash. ​ From an egyptian book there is a reference to 'the tree of emerald green'​... I wonder what that is, if it is a specific tree, or just reference to the tree of life.</​fc>​\\ <fc red><​sup>​72</​sup></​fc><​sub>​This motif also include that of the "​clashing rocks" (Frobenius, p. 405). The hero often has to steer his ship between two rocks that clash together. (A similar idea is that of the biting door or the snapping tree-trunk.) .... This formulation implies that opening the rock is an undertaking that can never be accomplished in reality, it can only be //​wished//​. ​  ... The bird is a symbol of "​wishful thinking."​ <fc green>(I think of the bird, flight, and mans wish to fly...there has always been an eternal gaze of man towards the skies, towards birds that can soar.)</​fc></​sub>​
Line 705: Line 705:
  
 A [[wp>​Triptych|triptych]] from a medieval church in Brugge\\ ​ A [[wp>​Triptych|triptych]] from a medieval church in Brugge\\ ​
-{{ :aker:collected_works:​triptych.jpg?​640 |}}+{{ collected_works:​triptych.jpg?​640 |}}
  
-| The painting Triomferende Christus by [[wp>​Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder|Marcus Gheeraerts de oude]], c1550 \\ {{ :aker:collected_works:​christus_triumphator.jpg?​315 |}} | The feet of Christ amplified from the painting, at the feet of christ; the world, Adam's skull, the snake of the devil.\\ {{ :aker:collected_works:​christus_triumphator_adam.png?​438 |}} |+| The painting Triomferende Christus by [[wp>​Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder|Marcus Gheeraerts de oude]], c1550 \\ {{ collected_works:​christus_triumphator.jpg?​315 |}} | The feet of Christ amplified from the painting, at the feet of christ; the world, Adam's skull, the snake of the devil.\\ {{ collected_works:​christus_triumphator_adam.png?​438 |}} |
  
 [[#top|back to top]] [[#top|back to top]]
Line 713: Line 713:
 <fc green>​See footnote 84, page 248, "a lime tree that will be planted and throw out two boughs"​ ... a lime tree will bring forth the salvation of the world.</​fc>​ <fc green>​See footnote 84, page 248, "a lime tree that will be planted and throw out two boughs"​ ... a lime tree will bring forth the salvation of the world.</​fc>​
  
-§369 "​...Jewish tradition that Adam, before he knew Eve, had a demon-wife called Lilith, with whom he strove for supremacy. ​ But Lilith rose up into the air through the magic of God's name  ... Adam forced her to come back with the help of three angels,<​fc red><​sup>​85</​sup></​fc>​ whereupon Lilith changed into a nightmare or lamia (pl. XXXVIIIa) who haunted pregnant women and kidnapped new-born infants. ... This motif is a recurrent one in fairytales, where the mother often appears as a murderess<​fc red><​sup>​86</​sup></​fc>​ or eater of human flesh (pl. XXXVIIIb); a well-known German paradigm is the story of Hansel and Gretel. ​ ... Lamia is also the name of a large, voracious fish,<fc red><​sup>​87</​sup></​fc>​ ... Once again we meet the idea of the terrible Mother in the form of a voracious fish, a personification of death.<​fc red><​sup>​88</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​85</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Here we may discern, perhaps, the motif of the "​helpful bird" - angels are really birds. ... The symbolism of the three angels is important because it signifies the upper, aerial, spiritual triad in conflict with the //one// lower, feminine power. Cf. my "[[aker:collected_works:​cw9i#​the_phenomenology_of_the_spirit_in_fairytales_384_-_455|Phenomenology of the Spirit in Fairy Tales]]"​ (1954/55 edn., pp. 25ff.). <fc green>( [[aker:collected_works:​cw9i|CW 9i]])</​fc></​sub>​+§369 "​...Jewish tradition that Adam, before he knew Eve, had a demon-wife called Lilith, with whom he strove for supremacy. ​ But Lilith rose up into the air through the magic of God's name  ... Adam forced her to come back with the help of three angels,<​fc red><​sup>​85</​sup></​fc>​ whereupon Lilith changed into a nightmare or lamia (pl. XXXVIIIa) who haunted pregnant women and kidnapped new-born infants. ... This motif is a recurrent one in fairytales, where the mother often appears as a murderess<​fc red><​sup>​86</​sup></​fc>​ or eater of human flesh (pl. XXXVIIIb); a well-known German paradigm is the story of Hansel and Gretel. ​ ... Lamia is also the name of a large, voracious fish,<fc red><​sup>​87</​sup></​fc>​ ... Once again we meet the idea of the terrible Mother in the form of a voracious fish, a personification of death.<​fc red><​sup>​88</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​85</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Here we may discern, perhaps, the motif of the "​helpful bird" - angels are really birds. ... The symbolism of the three angels is important because it signifies the upper, aerial, spiritual triad in conflict with the //one// lower, feminine power. Cf. my "​[[collected_works:​cw9i#​the_phenomenology_of_the_spirit_in_fairytales_384_-_455|Phenomenology of the Spirit in Fairy Tales]]"​ (1954/55 edn., pp. 25ff.). <fc green>( [[collected_works:​cw9i|CW 9i]])</​fc></​sub>​
  
 §370 "The lamias are typical nightmares whose feminine nature is abundantly documented.<​fc red><​sup>​89</​sup></​fc> ​ Their universal peculiarity is that they //ride// their victims. ​ Their counterparts are the spectral horses who **//​carry//​** their riders away at a mad gallop. ..." <fc green>​(Emphasis mine)  Read more here about some comments on child psychology. ​ Notably the sexual meaning of riding fantasies. ​ There'​s lots more in the next couple of paragraphs about the etymology of the word ' //mare// '​. ​ Its worth noting footnote 94 on p.250; a note from the Editor, 'Not all etymological conjectures in this passage are now considered warranted."</​fc>​ \\  §370 "The lamias are typical nightmares whose feminine nature is abundantly documented.<​fc red><​sup>​89</​sup></​fc> ​ Their universal peculiarity is that they //ride// their victims. ​ Their counterparts are the spectral horses who **//​carry//​** their riders away at a mad gallop. ..." <fc green>​(Emphasis mine)  Read more here about some comments on child psychology. ​ Notably the sexual meaning of riding fantasies. ​ There'​s lots more in the next couple of paragraphs about the etymology of the word ' //mare// '​. ​ Its worth noting footnote 94 on p.250; a note from the Editor, 'Not all etymological conjectures in this passage are now considered warranted."</​fc>​ \\ 
Line 769: Line 769:
  
  
-§406 "​...the image of the "​soul"​ somehow coincides with the mother-imago.<​fc red><​sup>​142</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​142</​sup></​fc><​sub>​See //[[aker:collected_works:​cw6|Psychological Types]]//, "​Soul"​ and "soul image,"​ Defs. 48 and 49.  The //anima// is the archetype of the feminine and play a very important role in a man's unconscious. ​ See " [[aker:collected_works:​cw7|The Relations between the Ego and the Unconscious]],"​ Ch. II. I have discussed the world-soul of Plato'​s //​[[wp>​Timaeus (dialogue)|Timaeus]]//​ in " [[aker:collected_works:​cw11|A Psychological Approach to the Dogma of the Trinity]],"​ pars. 186ff.</​sub>​+§406 "​...the image of the "​soul"​ somehow coincides with the mother-imago.<​fc red><​sup>​142</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​142</​sup></​fc><​sub>​See //​[[collected_works:​cw6|Psychological Types]]//, "​Soul"​ and "soul image,"​ Defs. 48 and 49.  The //anima// is the archetype of the feminine and play a very important role in a man's unconscious. ​ See " [[collected_works:​cw7|The Relations between the Ego and the Unconscious]],"​ Ch. II. I have discussed the world-soul of Plato'​s //​[[wp>​Timaeus (dialogue)|Timaeus]]//​ in " [[collected_works:​cw11|A Psychological Approach to the Dogma of the Trinity]],"​ pars. 186ff.</​sub>​
  
 §408 <fc green>​Egyptian Tum of [[wp>​Atum|Atum]]. The [[wp>​Ankh|Ankh]] or //crux ansata// (Latin meaning "cross with a handle"​) was the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphic character that read "​life"​.</​fc>​ §408 <fc green>​Egyptian Tum of [[wp>​Atum|Atum]]. The [[wp>​Ankh|Ankh]] or //crux ansata// (Latin meaning "cross with a handle"​) was the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphic character that read "​life"​.</​fc>​
Line 811: Line 811:
  
 §428 "​...sometimes the devil rides on a //​three-legged//​ horse. ... "​\\ ​ §428 "​...sometimes the devil rides on a //​three-legged//​ horse. ... "​\\ ​
-<fc red><​sup>​30</​sup></​fc><​sub>​ ... Cf. my remarks on the three-legged horse in " [[aker:collected_works:​cw9i#​the_phenomenology_of_the_spirit_in_fairytales_384_-_455|The Phenomenology of the Spirit in Fairy Tales]]"​ (1954/55 edn., p. 28).</​sub>​+<fc red><​sup>​30</​sup></​fc><​sub>​ ... Cf. my remarks on the three-legged horse in " [[collected_works:​cw9i#​the_phenomenology_of_the_spirit_in_fairytales_384_-_455|The Phenomenology of the Spirit in Fairy Tales]]"​ (1954/55 edn., p. 28).</​sub>​
  
 §429ff <fc green>​Jung discussing Shakespeare'​s //Julius Caesar// in the context of Miss Miller'​s fantasy. ​ </​fc>​\\ ​ §429ff <fc green>​Jung discussing Shakespeare'​s //Julius Caesar// in the context of Miss Miller'​s fantasy. ​ </​fc>​\\ ​
 §431 "An individual is infantile because he has freed himself insufficiently,​ or not at all, from his childish environment and his adaptation to his parents, ..." §431 "An individual is infantile because he has freed himself insufficiently,​ or not at all, from his childish environment and his adaptation to his parents, ..."
  
-[[aker:Death|Ω]] §432 "That the highest summit of life can be expressed through the symbolism of death is a well-known fact, **//for any growing beyond oneself means death//** ... Love and death have not a little to do with one another. " <fc green>​(Emphasis mine) I like this, the summit here that Jung mentions is the death at the end of life - that he calls it a summit is interesting. ​ However, the notion of death accompanying any 'going beyond'​ stage of life is crucial too.</​fc>​+[[:death|Ω]] §432 "That the highest summit of life can be expressed through the symbolism of death is a well-known fact, **//for any growing beyond oneself means death//** ... Love and death have not a little to do with one another. " <fc green>​(Emphasis mine) I like this, the summit here that Jung mentions is the death at the end of life - that he calls it a summit is interesting. ​ However, the notion of death accompanying any 'going beyond'​ stage of life is crucial too.</​fc>​
  
 §433 <fc green>​This comment is in the context of Miss Miller'​s fantasies, but worth noting from a general rule of thumb perspective when registering peoples reactions - I think Jung is correct when he says: </fc> "When a gesture turns out to be too theatrical it gives ground for the suspicion that it is not genuine, that somewhere a contrary will is at work which intends something quite different."​ §433 <fc green>​This comment is in the context of Miss Miller'​s fantasies, but worth noting from a general rule of thumb perspective when registering peoples reactions - I think Jung is correct when he says: </fc> "When a gesture turns out to be too theatrical it gives ground for the suspicion that it is not genuine, that somewhere a contrary will is at work which intends something quite different."​
Line 908: Line 908:
 > Longfellow had originally planned on following Schoolcraft in calling his hero Manabozho, the name in use at the time among the Ojibwe of the south shore of Lake Superior for a figure of their folklore, a trickster-transformer. But in his journal entry for June 28, 1854, he wrote, "Work at '​Manabozho'​ or, as I think I shall call it, '​Hiawatha'​ —that being another name for the same personage."​ Hiawatha was not "​another name for the same personage"​ (the mistaken identification of the trickster figure was made first by Schoolcraft and compounded by Longfellow),​ but a probable historical figure associated with the founding of the League of the Iroquois, the Five Nations then located in present-day New York and Pennsylvania. > Longfellow had originally planned on following Schoolcraft in calling his hero Manabozho, the name in use at the time among the Ojibwe of the south shore of Lake Superior for a figure of their folklore, a trickster-transformer. But in his journal entry for June 28, 1854, he wrote, "Work at '​Manabozho'​ or, as I think I shall call it, '​Hiawatha'​ —that being another name for the same personage."​ Hiawatha was not "​another name for the same personage"​ (the mistaken identification of the trickster figure was made first by Schoolcraft and compounded by Longfellow),​ but a probable historical figure associated with the founding of the League of the Iroquois, the Five Nations then located in present-day New York and Pennsylvania.
  
-§476 <fc red><​sup>​11</​sup></​fc><​sub>​On the motif of the "​friend,"​ see my paper "[[aker:collected_works:​cw9i|Concerning Rebirth]]"​ CW 9i, (Swiss edn., pp. 53f.).</​sub>​+§476 <fc red><​sup>​11</​sup></​fc><​sub>​On the motif of the "​friend,"​ see my paper "​[[collected_works:​cw9i|Concerning Rebirth]]"​ CW 9i, (Swiss edn., pp. 53f.).</​sub>​
  
 <fc green> [[wp>​Gitche Manitou|Gitche Manitou]] (Gitche Manitou, Kitchi Manitou, etc.) means "Great Spirit"​ in several Algonquian languages. (from wikipedia) </fc> <fc green> [[wp>​Gitche Manitou|Gitche Manitou]] (Gitche Manitou, Kitchi Manitou, etc.) means "Great Spirit"​ in several Algonquian languages. (from wikipedia) </fc>
Line 929: Line 929:
 <fc red><​sup>​25</​sup></​fc><​sub>​... According to a medieval tradition, Mary's conception of Jesus took place through the ear.</​sub>​ <fc red><​sup>​25</​sup></​fc><​sub>​... According to a medieval tradition, Mary's conception of Jesus took place through the ear.</​sub>​
  
-§492 "​...fertilisation by a theriomorphic symbol, the elephant, ... In Christian picture-language the unicorn, as well as the dove, is a symbol of the spermatic Word or Spirit.<​fc red><​sup>​26</​sup></​fc>​ (Cf. pl. VIII)"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​26</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Cf. [[aker:collected_works:​cw12|Psychology and Alchemy]] pars. 518ff.</​sub>​+§492 "​...fertilisation by a theriomorphic symbol, the elephant, ... In Christian picture-language the unicorn, as well as the dove, is a symbol of the spermatic Word or Spirit.<​fc red><​sup>​26</​sup></​fc>​ (Cf. pl. VIII)"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​26</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Cf. [[collected_works:​cw12|Psychology and Alchemy]] pars. 518ff.</​sub>​
  
 [[#top|back to top]] [[#top|back to top]]
Line 959: Line 959:
  
  
-<fc green>​Page 325, footnote 32 - I'm writing down this next footnote in support of my [[aker:​space_and_time|space and time thoughts]] :).  Also, I'm not sure I understand the footnote exactly...Cf. the first part of para. 500 that I think explains this.</​fc>​\\ ​+<fc green>​Page 325, footnote 32 - I'm writing down this next footnote in support of my [[:​space_and_time|space and time thoughts]] :).  Also, I'm not sure I understand the footnote exactly...Cf. the first part of para. 500 that I think explains this.</​fc>​\\ ​
 <fc red><​sup>​32</​sup></​fc><​sub>​By "​primal experience"​ is meant that first human differentiation between subject and object, that first conscious objectivation which is psychologically inconceivable without an inner division of the human animal against himself - the very means by which he separated himself from the oneness of nature.</​sub>​ <fc red><​sup>​32</​sup></​fc><​sub>​By "​primal experience"​ is meant that first human differentiation between subject and object, that first conscious objectivation which is psychologically inconceivable without an inner division of the human animal against himself - the very means by which he separated himself from the oneness of nature.</​sub>​
  
Line 967: Line 967:
  
 §503 <fc green>In the context of Hiawatha of course: </​fc>"​The animal is a representative of the unconscious,​ and the latter, as the matrix of consciousness,​ has a maternal significance,​ which explains why the mother was also represented by the bear.  All animals belong to the Great Mother ... Whoever succeeds in killing the "​magic"​ animal, the symbolic representative of the animal mother, acquires something of her gigantic strength."​ <fc green>​(Hence Hiawatha clothes himself in the roebuck skin; gloves and moccasins. ​ By wearing the animals skins there is somewhat of a resurrection of the animal and the hero has gained some of its powers.)</​fc>​\\ ​ §503 <fc green>In the context of Hiawatha of course: </​fc>"​The animal is a representative of the unconscious,​ and the latter, as the matrix of consciousness,​ has a maternal significance,​ which explains why the mother was also represented by the bear.  All animals belong to the Great Mother ... Whoever succeeds in killing the "​magic"​ animal, the symbolic representative of the animal mother, acquires something of her gigantic strength."​ <fc green>​(Hence Hiawatha clothes himself in the roebuck skin; gloves and moccasins. ​ By wearing the animals skins there is somewhat of a resurrection of the animal and the hero has gained some of its powers.)</​fc>​\\ ​
-<fc red><​sup>​36</​sup></​fc><​sub>​... Water as an obstacle in dreams seems to indicate the mother, or a regression of libido. ​ Crossing the water means overcoming the obstacle, i.e., the mother as symbol of man's longing for the condition of sleep or death. ​ See my [[aker:collected_works:​cw7|CW7 "On the Psychology of the Unconscious"​]],​ p. 87.</​sub>​+<fc red><​sup>​36</​sup></​fc><​sub>​... Water as an obstacle in dreams seems to indicate the mother, or a regression of libido. ​ Crossing the water means overcoming the obstacle, i.e., the mother as symbol of man's longing for the condition of sleep or death. ​ See my [[collected_works:​cw7|CW7 "On the Psychology of the Unconscious"​]],​ p. 87.</​sub>​
  
 §504 <fc green>​Cf. para 473, 'mater saeva cupidinum',​ the savage mother of desire. \\ Also, noteworthy; footnote 38, page 328 - Jung mentions Spielrein'​s development of the 'death instinct'​ of the back of the Terrible Mother;</​fc>​ "​...who devours and destroys, and thus symbolises death itself.<​fc red><​sup>​38</​sup></​fc>"​ §504 <fc green>​Cf. para 473, 'mater saeva cupidinum',​ the savage mother of desire. \\ Also, noteworthy; footnote 38, page 328 - Jung mentions Spielrein'​s development of the 'death instinct'​ of the back of the Terrible Mother;</​fc>​ "​...who devours and destroys, and thus symbolises death itself.<​fc red><​sup>​38</​sup></​fc>"​
Line 1007: Line 1007:
 <fc green> **//The father-in-law//​** </fc> <fc green> **//The father-in-law//​** </fc>
  
-§515 "The archetype of the wise old man first appears in the father, being a personification of meaning and spirit in its procreative sense.<​fc red><​sup>​44</​sup></​fc> ​ The hero's father is often a master carpenter or some kind of artisan."​\\ <fc red><​sup>​44</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Cf. my " [[aker:collected_works:​cw9i#​the_phenomenology_of_the_spirit_in_fairytales_384_-_455|Phenomenology of the Spirit in Fairy Tales]]."​ </​sub>​\\ ​+§515 "The archetype of the wise old man first appears in the father, being a personification of meaning and spirit in its procreative sense.<​fc red><​sup>​44</​sup></​fc> ​ The hero's father is often a master carpenter or some kind of artisan."​\\ <fc red><​sup>​44</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Cf. my " [[collected_works:​cw9i#​the_phenomenology_of_the_spirit_in_fairytales_384_-_455|Phenomenology of the Spirit in Fairy Tales]]."​ </​sub>​\\ ​
  
 §516 "​Finally,​ father-attributes may occasionally fall to the son himself, i.e., when it has become apparent that he is of one nature with the father. \\ The hero symbolises a man's //​unconscious self//, and this manifests itself empirically as the sum total of all archetypes and therefore includes the archetype of the father and the wise old man.  To that extent the hero is his own father and his own begetter."​ §516 "​Finally,​ father-attributes may occasionally fall to the son himself, i.e., when it has become apparent that he is of one nature with the father. \\ The hero symbolises a man's //​unconscious self//, and this manifests itself empirically as the sum total of all archetypes and therefore includes the archetype of the father and the wise old man.  To that extent the hero is his own father and his own begetter."​
Line 1044: Line 1044:
 §531 "The parallel to the motif of dying and rising again is that of being lost and found again. ​ I appears ritually at exactly the same place, in connection with the //​hiros-gamos//​ -like spring festivities,​ ...." §531 "The parallel to the motif of dying and rising again is that of being lost and found again. ​ I appears ritually at exactly the same place, in connection with the //​hiros-gamos//​ -like spring festivities,​ ...."
  
-[[aker:Death|Ω]] §532 "We can see from these accounts how comforting the Eleusinian mysteries were for the celebrant'​s hopes of a world to come.  One epitaph says: +[[:death|Ω]] §532 "We can see from these accounts how comforting the Eleusinian mysteries were for the celebrant'​s hopes of a world to come.  One epitaph says: 
 > Truly the blessed gods have proclaimed a most beautiful secret: \\ Death comes not as a curse, but as a blessing to men! > Truly the blessed gods have proclaimed a most beautiful secret: \\ Death comes not as a curse, but as a blessing to men!
  
Line 1089: Line 1089:
 <fc green> **//a good summary//** </fc> <fc green> **//a good summary//** </fc>
  
-[[aker:Death|Ω]] §553 <fc green>​The sun's journey as a primordial image of life.  Worth a read - its a long one.  The longing for the mother, for 'the stillness and profound peace of all-knowing non-existence'​.</​fc>​\\ "Even in his highest strivings for harmony and balance, for the profundities of philosophy and the raptures of the artist, he seeks death, immobility, satiety, rest."​\\ ​ [[aker:​Religion|Σ]] ​ "... the young person should sacrifice his childhood and his childish dependence on the physical parents, lest he remain caught body and soul in the bonds of unconscious incest. ​ This regressive tendency has been consistently opposed from the most primitive times by the great psychotherapeutic systems which we know as the religions."​\\ <fc green>​Footnote 97, Zosimos </​fc>​\\ ​ "... So, as soon as we feel ourselves slipping, we begin to combat this tendency and erect barriers against the dark, rising flood of the unconscious and its enticements to regression, which all too easily takes on the deceptive guise of sacrosanct ideals, principles, beliefs, etc.  If we wish to stay on the heights we have reached, we must struggle all the time to consolidate our consciousness and its attitude."​ <fc green> **//This is not as positive as it sounds, read further to understand that these ideals we hang on to with our consciousness do not last...'​we must struggle'​ as he says!//** </​fc>​\\ " ... Everything young grows old, all beauty fades, all heat cools, all brightness dims, and every truth becomes stale and trite. ​ For all these things have taken on shape, and all shapes are worn thin by the working of **//​time//​** ; they age, sicken, crumble to dust - unless they change. ​ But change they can, for the invisible spark that generated them is potent enough for infinite generation. ... " <fc green>​(Emphasis mine)</​fc>​+[[:death|Ω]] §553 <fc green>​The sun's journey as a primordial image of life.  Worth a read - its a long one.  The longing for the mother, for 'the stillness and profound peace of all-knowing non-existence'​.</​fc>​\\ "Even in his highest strivings for harmony and balance, for the profundities of philosophy and the raptures of the artist, he seeks death, immobility, satiety, rest."​\\ ​ [[aker:​Religion|Σ]] ​ "... the young person should sacrifice his childhood and his childish dependence on the physical parents, lest he remain caught body and soul in the bonds of unconscious incest. ​ This regressive tendency has been consistently opposed from the most primitive times by the great psychotherapeutic systems which we know as the religions."​\\ <fc green>​Footnote 97, Zosimos </​fc>​\\ ​ "... So, as soon as we feel ourselves slipping, we begin to combat this tendency and erect barriers against the dark, rising flood of the unconscious and its enticements to regression, which all too easily takes on the deceptive guise of sacrosanct ideals, principles, beliefs, etc.  If we wish to stay on the heights we have reached, we must struggle all the time to consolidate our consciousness and its attitude."​ <fc green> **//This is not as positive as it sounds, read further to understand that these ideals we hang on to with our consciousness do not last...'​we must struggle'​ as he says!//** </​fc>​\\ " ... Everything young grows old, all beauty fades, all heat cools, all brightness dims, and every truth becomes stale and trite. ​ For all these things have taken on shape, and all shapes are worn thin by the working of **//​time//​** ; they age, sicken, crumble to dust - unless they change. ​ But change they can, for the invisible spark that generated them is potent enough for infinite generation. ... " <fc green>​(Emphasis mine)</​fc>​
  
 §554 <fc green>​What Jung does here in this paragraph is segue'​s into other material related to the archetypal themes in Hiawatha, and of course others 'which rise up again and again'​...he does this to bring in Siegfried I think in the next para.</​fc>​ §554 <fc green>​What Jung does here in this paragraph is segue'​s into other material related to the archetypal themes in Hiawatha, and of course others 'which rise up again and again'​...he does this to bring in Siegfried I think in the next para.</​fc>​
Line 1121: Line 1121:
 <fc green>I find it interesting that the flood as something known predominantly from the Bible - Noah and the ark, was also an event from Greek mythology. ​ Zeus sent a flood - a deluge - to destroy all the evil on earth after he'd sent Pandora'​s and her box to earth with the opposite consequences to what he'd hoped. ​ Only Deucalion the son of Prometheus and his wife Pyrrha were saved, as the re-start of all human life (made from throwing rocks over their shoulders :) ) </fc> <fc green>I find it interesting that the flood as something known predominantly from the Bible - Noah and the ark, was also an event from Greek mythology. ​ Zeus sent a flood - a deluge - to destroy all the evil on earth after he'd sent Pandora'​s and her box to earth with the opposite consequences to what he'd hoped. ​ Only Deucalion the son of Prometheus and his wife Pyrrha were saved, as the re-start of all human life (made from throwing rocks over their shoulders :) ) </fc>
  
-[[aker:Death|Ω]] §572 "... There was also an " [[wp>​Acherusia|Acherusian]]"​ lake.<fc red><​sup>​122</​sup></​fc>​ This chasm, therefore, was the entrance to the place where death had been conquered."​+[[:death|Ω]] §572 "... There was also an " [[wp>​Acherusia|Acherusian]]"​ lake.<fc red><​sup>​122</​sup></​fc>​ This chasm, therefore, was the entrance to the place where death had been conquered."​
  
 <fc green> **//Theme of the dragon in the cave//** \\ Paras. 570-574. Following on from Fafnir - there seems to be a theme here of the dragon - or monster - in the cave that is slain or locked up.  There is reference to the book of revelation too and this theme. ​ The dragon seems to pierce with a sword, or his tongue the sacrificed person, very often a girl.</​fc>​ <fc green> **//Theme of the dragon in the cave//** \\ Paras. 570-574. Following on from Fafnir - there seems to be a theme here of the dragon - or monster - in the cave that is slain or locked up.  There is reference to the book of revelation too and this theme. ​ The dragon seems to pierce with a sword, or his tongue the sacrificed person, very often a girl.</​fc>​
Line 1164: Line 1164:
 §587 "The unconscious insinuates itself in the form of a snake if the conscious mind is afraid of the compensating tendency of the unconscious,​ as is generally the case in regression. ​ But if the compensation is accepted in principle, there is no regression, and the unconscious can be met half-way through introversion." ​ <fc green> **//read further//** ...interesting note about the compensatory aspect of the unconscious that is not always able to be accepted: </fc> " ... where compensation appears in a form that cannot be accepted and could only be overcome by something that is equally impossible for the patient. ​ Cases of this kind occur when the unconscious has been resisted for too long in principle, and a wedge violently driven between **//​instinct//​** and the conscious mind." <fc green>​(Emphasis mine.  Interesting that Jung uses '​instinct'​ here, not '​unconscious'​.) </fc> §587 "The unconscious insinuates itself in the form of a snake if the conscious mind is afraid of the compensating tendency of the unconscious,​ as is generally the case in regression. ​ But if the compensation is accepted in principle, there is no regression, and the unconscious can be met half-way through introversion." ​ <fc green> **//read further//** ...interesting note about the compensatory aspect of the unconscious that is not always able to be accepted: </fc> " ... where compensation appears in a form that cannot be accepted and could only be overcome by something that is equally impossible for the patient. ​ Cases of this kind occur when the unconscious has been resisted for too long in principle, and a wedge violently driven between **//​instinct//​** and the conscious mind." <fc green>​(Emphasis mine.  Interesting that Jung uses '​instinct'​ here, not '​unconscious'​.) </fc>
  
-[[aker:Alchemy|Δ]] §588 <fc green>​(Cf. para 587)</​fc>​ "​Through introversion,​ as numerous historical witnesses testify, one is fertilised, inspired, regenerated,​ and reborn."​ <fc green>​Cf. the example of Prajapati creating the world the an '​introversion'​ motif. </​fc> ​ §589f <fc green> [[wp>​Prajapati|Prajapati]] .  Also, see footnote 169 on page 381.  This idea of introversion,​ '​Self-incubation'​ or '​self-castigation',​ the act of '​self-abnegation'​...is similar to the alchemical view of the closed alembic (i.e. us, and the boiling of libido, our own heat to create) for the purpose of rebirth and creativity. </fc>+[[:alchemy|Δ]] §588 <fc green>​(Cf. para 587)</​fc>​ "​Through introversion,​ as numerous historical witnesses testify, one is fertilised, inspired, regenerated,​ and reborn."​ <fc green>​Cf. the example of Prajapati creating the world the an '​introversion'​ motif. </​fc> ​ §589f <fc green> [[wp>​Prajapati|Prajapati]] .  Also, see footnote 169 on page 381.  This idea of introversion,​ '​Self-incubation'​ or '​self-castigation',​ the act of '​self-abnegation'​...is similar to the alchemical view of the closed alembic (i.e. us, and the boiling of libido, our own heat to create) for the purpose of rebirth and creativity. </fc>
  
 §592 "The hero who sets himself the task of renewing the world and conquering death ...coiled round its own egg like a snake, ..." §592 "The hero who sets himself the task of renewing the world and conquering death ...coiled round its own egg like a snake, ..."
  
-§593 "The hero is himself the snake, himself the **//​sacrificer and the sacrificed//​** , ..." <fc green>​(Emphasis mine)</​fc>​\\ <fc green>​Cf. [[aker:collected_works:​cw13#​ii_the_visions_of_zosimos_85_-_144|CW13,​ 'The visions of Zosimos'​]] para. 91ff </fc>+§593 "The hero is himself the snake, himself the **//​sacrificer and the sacrificed//​** , ..." <fc green>​(Emphasis mine)</​fc>​\\ <fc green>​Cf. [[collected_works:​cw13#​ii_the_visions_of_zosimos_85_-_144|CW13,​ 'The visions of Zosimos'​]] para. 91ff </fc>
  
 ~~SEARCHPATTERN#'/​(.*§91 \s*([^\n\r]+).*)/​i'??​ +aker:​collected_works:​cw13 _sprender $quote ??~~ ~~SEARCHPATTERN#'/​(.*§91 \s*([^\n\r]+).*)/​i'??​ +aker:​collected_works:​cw13 _sprender $quote ??~~
  
-§594f <fc green>​The act of skinning a sacrifice. Also flaying motif. ​ See [[aker:collected_works:​cw11|CW11 '​Transformation Symbolism of the Mass'​]].</​fc>​+§594f <fc green>​The act of skinning a sacrifice. Also flaying motif. ​ See [[collected_works:​cw11|CW11 '​Transformation Symbolism of the Mass'​]].</​fc>​
  
 <fc green>​Interesting comment in footnote 181, page 384.  I think it important in its reference to time - immortality - the fact that we have both in us, even in life.  We have these two worlds and it is not easy to live with both all the time. </fc> "That is to say, man does not change at death into his immortal part, but is mortal and immortal even in life, being both ego and self." <fc green>​Interesting comment in footnote 181, page 384.  I think it important in its reference to time - immortality - the fact that we have both in us, even in life.  We have these two worlds and it is not easy to live with both all the time. </fc> "That is to say, man does not change at death into his immortal part, but is mortal and immortal even in life, being both ego and self."
Line 1197: Line 1197:
 §615 "​...and the snake is the representative of the world of instinct, especially of those vital processes which are psychologically the least accessible of all. Snake dreams always indicate a discrepancy between the attitude of the conscious mind and instinct, the snake being a personification of the threatening aspect of that conflict. The appearance of the green viper therefore means: "Look out! Danger ahead!""​ §615 "​...and the snake is the representative of the world of instinct, especially of those vital processes which are psychologically the least accessible of all. Snake dreams always indicate a discrepancy between the attitude of the conscious mind and instinct, the snake being a personification of the threatening aspect of that conflict. The appearance of the green viper therefore means: "Look out! Danger ahead!""​
  
-[[aker:Death|Ω]] §617 "If it is not possible for the libido to strive forwards, to lead a life that willingly accepts all dangers and ultimate decay, then it strikes back along the other road and sinks into its own depths, working down to the old intimation of the immortality of all that lives, to the old longing for rebirth."​+[[:death|Ω]] §617 "If it is not possible for the libido to strive forwards, to lead a life that willingly accepts all dangers and ultimate decay, then it strikes back along the other road and sinks into its own depths, working down to the old intimation of the immortality of all that lives, to the old longing for rebirth."​
  
 [[aker:​Religion|Σ]] §622 "In the Dionysus legend the ass plays an important part as the steed of Silenus. The ass pertains to the "​second sun," Saturn, who was the star of Israel and is therefore to some extent identical with Yahweh."​\\ <fc green>​Cross reference here the Golden Bough notes on Dionysus.</​fc>​ [[aker:​Religion|Σ]] §622 "In the Dionysus legend the ass plays an important part as the steed of Silenus. The ass pertains to the "​second sun," Saturn, who was the star of Israel and is therefore to some extent identical with Yahweh."​\\ <fc green>​Cross reference here the Golden Bough notes on Dionysus.</​fc>​
Line 1203: Line 1203:
 §625 "​Regression is also an involuntary introversion in so far as the past is an object of memory and therefore a psychic content, an endopsychic factor. It is a relapse into the past caused by a depression in the present. Depression should therefore be regarded as an unconscious compensation whose content must be made conscious if it is to be fully effective."​ §625 "​Regression is also an involuntary introversion in so far as the past is an object of memory and therefore a psychic content, an endopsychic factor. It is a relapse into the past caused by a depression in the present. Depression should therefore be regarded as an unconscious compensation whose content must be made conscious if it is to be fully effective."​
  
-[[aker:Death|Ω]] §630 "Near is God, And hard to apprehend. But where danger is, there Arises salvation also." <fc green>​From '​Patmos'</​fc>​+[[:death|Ω]] §630 "Near is God, And hard to apprehend. But where danger is, there Arises salvation also." <fc green>​From '​Patmos'</​fc>​
  
 <fc green>​Speaking of the hero remaining in the unconscious...</​fc>​\\ §644 "That such a step includes the solution, or at least some consideration,​ of the sexual problem is obvious enough, for unless this is done the unemployed libido will inevitably remain fixed in the unconscious endogamous relationship to the parents and will seriously hamper the individual'​s freedom."​\\ <fc green>I think here of Oedipus and his inevitable fate, although he was destined from birth to kill his father, I can't remember if the Oracle foretold that he would also marry his mother. Psychologically speaking, I wonder what it was that his parents or he did that caused him to be locked in the endogamous relationship of marrying his mother ....if my analogy is correct here.\\ ​ This passage also seems to point directly to Freud and Jungs confrontation with Freuds view on sex and libido. Where Freud thought much of regression was due to the sexual energy, Jung is saying it is just a part of it. Moreover, Jung is saying the endogamous archetypes/​forces of the mother were there from the start whereas Freud, I think portrayed this as a repressed urge. Jung goes on...</​fc>​ <fc green>​Speaking of the hero remaining in the unconscious...</​fc>​\\ §644 "That such a step includes the solution, or at least some consideration,​ of the sexual problem is obvious enough, for unless this is done the unemployed libido will inevitably remain fixed in the unconscious endogamous relationship to the parents and will seriously hamper the individual'​s freedom."​\\ <fc green>I think here of Oedipus and his inevitable fate, although he was destined from birth to kill his father, I can't remember if the Oracle foretold that he would also marry his mother. Psychologically speaking, I wonder what it was that his parents or he did that caused him to be locked in the endogamous relationship of marrying his mother ....if my analogy is correct here.\\ ​ This passage also seems to point directly to Freud and Jungs confrontation with Freuds view on sex and libido. Where Freud thought much of regression was due to the sexual energy, Jung is saying it is just a part of it. Moreover, Jung is saying the endogamous archetypes/​forces of the mother were there from the start whereas Freud, I think portrayed this as a repressed urge. Jung goes on...</​fc>​
Line 1211: Line 1211:
 <​sup>​10</​sup>"​You are Israel'​s teacher,"​ said Jesus, "and do you not understand these things? <​sup>​11</​sup>​ Very truly I tell you, we speak of what we know, and we testify to what we have seen, but still you people do not accept our testimony. <​sup>​12</​sup>​ I have spoken to you of earthly things and you do not believe; how then will you believe if I speak of heavenly things? <​sup>​13</​sup>​ No one has ever gone into heaven except the one who came from heaven'​—the Son of Man. <​sup>​14</​sup>​ Just as Moses lifted up the snake in the wilderness, so the Son of Man must be lifted up,<​sup>​15</​sup>​ that everyone who believes may have eternal life in him." <​sup>​16</​sup>​ For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life. <​sup>​17</​sup>​ For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but to save the world through him. <​sup>​18</​sup>​ Whoever believes in him is not condemned, but whoever does not believe stands condemned already because they have not believed in the name of God'​’s one and only Son. <​sup>​19</​sup>​ This is the verdict: Light has come into the world, but people loved darkness instead of light because their deeds were evil. <​sup>​20</​sup>​ Everyone who does evil hates the light, and will not come into the light for fear that their deeds will be exposed. <​sup>​21</​sup>​ But whoever lives by the truth comes into the light, so that it may be seen plainly that what they have done has been done in the sight of God.  <​sup>​10</​sup>"​You are Israel'​s teacher,"​ said Jesus, "and do you not understand these things? <​sup>​11</​sup>​ Very truly I tell you, we speak of what we know, and we testify to what we have seen, but still you people do not accept our testimony. <​sup>​12</​sup>​ I have spoken to you of earthly things and you do not believe; how then will you believe if I speak of heavenly things? <​sup>​13</​sup>​ No one has ever gone into heaven except the one who came from heaven'​—the Son of Man. <​sup>​14</​sup>​ Just as Moses lifted up the snake in the wilderness, so the Son of Man must be lifted up,<​sup>​15</​sup>​ that everyone who believes may have eternal life in him." <​sup>​16</​sup>​ For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life. <​sup>​17</​sup>​ For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but to save the world through him. <​sup>​18</​sup>​ Whoever believes in him is not condemned, but whoever does not believe stands condemned already because they have not believed in the name of God'​’s one and only Son. <​sup>​19</​sup>​ This is the verdict: Light has come into the world, but people loved darkness instead of light because their deeds were evil. <​sup>​20</​sup>​ Everyone who does evil hates the light, and will not come into the light for fear that their deeds will be exposed. <​sup>​21</​sup>​ But whoever lives by the truth comes into the light, so that it may be seen plainly that what they have done has been done in the sight of God. 
  
-<fc green>It seems to me here that Jesus is talking of experience...and also of course the symbolical rebirth as mentioned in Jung §644, the start of a new man as Jung said, separated from his old family.\\ cf [[aker:collected_works:​cw12|CW 12]], §40</​fc>​+<fc green>It seems to me here that Jesus is talking of experience...and also of course the symbolical rebirth as mentioned in Jung §644, the start of a new man as Jung said, separated from his old family.\\ cf [[collected_works:​cw12|CW 12]], §40</​fc>​
  
 <fc green>​Jung continues...</​fc>​ <fc green>​Jung continues...</​fc>​
  
-[[aker:Death|Ω]] [[aker:​Religion|Σ]] §644 "When the libido thus remains fixed in its most primitive form it keeps men on a correspondingly low level where they have no control over themselves and are at the mercy of their affects. ...and the saviour and physician of that time was he who sought to free humanity from bondage to Heimarmene.<​sup><​fc red>​35</​fc></​sup>"​\\ <​sup><​fc red>​35</​fc></​sup><​sub>​This was the real purpose of all the mystery religions. They created symbols of death and rebirth. As Frazer points out in //The Golden Bough// (Part III "The Dying God," pp. 214ff.), even primitive peoples have in their initiation mysteries the same symbolism of dying and being born again as Apuleius records in connection with the initiation of Lucius in the Isis mysteries, "I approached the very gates of death and set one foot on Proserpine'​s threshold, yet was permitted to return, rapt through all the elements."​ The rites of initiation "​approximate to a voluntary death" from which Lucius was "born again"​.</​sub>​\\ <fc green>​This is fantastic - if the experience of Lucius is not similar to skydiving and extreme sports I'm not sure what is. The touching the threshold of death only to return 'rapt through all the elements'​ is an amazing description! I really enjoyed that.</​fc>​+[[:death|Ω]] [[aker:​Religion|Σ]] §644 "When the libido thus remains fixed in its most primitive form it keeps men on a correspondingly low level where they have no control over themselves and are at the mercy of their affects. ...and the saviour and physician of that time was he who sought to free humanity from bondage to Heimarmene.<​sup><​fc red>​35</​fc></​sup>"​\\ <​sup><​fc red>​35</​fc></​sup><​sub>​This was the real purpose of all the mystery religions. They created symbols of death and rebirth. As Frazer points out in //The Golden Bough// (Part III "The Dying God," pp. 214ff.), even primitive peoples have in their initiation mysteries the same symbolism of dying and being born again as Apuleius records in connection with the initiation of Lucius in the Isis mysteries, "I approached the very gates of death and set one foot on Proserpine'​s threshold, yet was permitted to return, rapt through all the elements."​ The rites of initiation "​approximate to a voluntary death" from which Lucius was "born again"​.</​sub>​\\ <fc green>​This is fantastic - if the experience of Lucius is not similar to skydiving and extreme sports I'm not sure what is. The touching the threshold of death only to return 'rapt through all the elements'​ is an amazing description! I really enjoyed that.</​fc>​
  
 [[aker:​Religion|Σ]] §652 "It is evident that by this is meant not a physical, but a psychological cosmogony. The world comes into being when man discovers it. But he only discovers it when he sacrifices his containment in the primal mother, the original state of the unconscious."​ [[aker:​Religion|Σ]] §652 "It is evident that by this is meant not a physical, but a psychological cosmogony. The world comes into being when man discovers it. But he only discovers it when he sacrifices his containment in the primal mother, the original state of the unconscious."​