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collected_works:cw6 [2016/01/31 02:27]
janus
collected_works:cw6 [2017/02/14 04:18]
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 [[aker:​Religion|Σ]] §80 "... religion offers stereotyped symbolic concepts that are meant to take the place of his unconscious once and for all.  The symbolic concepts of all religions are recreations of unconscious processes in a typical, universally binding form. ... Wherever we can observe a religion being born, we see how the doctrinal figures flow into the founder himself as revelations,​ in other words as concretisations of his unconscious fantasy. ​ The forms welling up from his unconscious are declared to be universally valid and thus replace the individual fantasies of others."​ [[aker:​Religion|Σ]] §80 "... religion offers stereotyped symbolic concepts that are meant to take the place of his unconscious once and for all.  The symbolic concepts of all religions are recreations of unconscious processes in a typical, universally binding form. ... Wherever we can observe a religion being born, we see how the doctrinal figures flow into the founder himself as revelations,​ in other words as concretisations of his unconscious fantasy. ​ The forms welling up from his unconscious are declared to be universally valid and thus replace the individual fantasies of others."​
  
-<fc green>​83pp talk about the language of psychology and the language of science. ​ It is very interesting. Cf. this with the introduction to [[aker:books_and_literature:​atom_and_archetype|Atom and Archetype]] : The Pauli / Jung Letters, 1932-1958</​fc>​+<fc green>​83pp talk about the language of psychology and the language of science. ​ It is very interesting. Cf. this with the introduction to [[books_and_literature:​atom_and_archetype|Atom and Archetype]] : The Pauli / Jung Letters, 1932-1958</​fc>​
  
 §83 "... We must be content with the fact that the unconscious was suppressed. ​ Psychologically,​ the suppression consists in a withdrawal of libido. ​ The libido thus gained promotes the growth and development of the conscious attitude, ... " §83 "... We must be content with the fact that the unconscious was suppressed. ​ Psychologically,​ the suppression consists in a withdrawal of libido. ​ The libido thus gained promotes the growth and development of the conscious attitude, ... "
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 === Compensation === === Compensation ===
  
-[[malefic:​igap:​neurosis|Ν]] §693 "means //​balancing//,​ //​adjusting//,​ //​supplementing//​. ​ The concept was introduced into the psychology of the neuroses by Adler.<​fc red><​sup>​20</​sup></​fc>​\\ <fc red><​sup>​20</​sup></​fc><​sub>//​The Neurotic Constitution//​. ​ References to the theory of compensation,​ originally inspired by G. Anton, are also to be found in Gross.</​sub>​\\ \\ <fc green>​Worth reading - the real nugget in the paragraph though I think is not so much the details of Adlers theory that Jung mentions but rather the theme of compensation that Adler highlighted,​ and that it is a process of the '​organism'​ (organs for Adler). ​ This is important as it resonates with Jung's 'self regulating'​ ideas of the psyche as a system and therefore, in this the compensatory aspect in neurosis comes through. ​ As Jung says at the end of the paragraph; </fc> "It corresponds to a similar function in the physiological sphere, namely, the self-regulation of the living organism."​\\ §694 "... I conceive it as functional adjustment in general, an inherent self-regulation of the psychic apparatus.<​fc red><​sup>​24</​sup></​fc> ​ **//In this sense, I regard the activity of the //​[[#​Unconscious|unconscious]]//​ (q.v.) as a balancing of the one-sidedness of the general //​[[#​Attitude|attitude]]//​ (q.v.) produced by the function of //​[[#​Consciousness|consciousness]]//​ (q.v.)//**. ... " ​ <fc green>​Worth reading on.  The para. continues with the discussion of how the tension of opposing attitudes develops and should it become too one sided, then the unconscious content will come through in the form of dreams and //​[[#​Images|images]]//​ as we know.  The theme of enantiodromia is present here.</​fc>​ "As a rule, the unconscious compensation does not run counter to consciousness,​ but is rather a balancing or supplementing of the conscious orientation. ​ **//In dreams, for instance, the unconscious supplies all those contents that are constellated by the conscious situation but are inhibited by conscious selection//​**,​ <fc green>​(See earlier discussion about how the subjective contents determine selection/​direction of the conscious attitude at the exclusion of other content. ​ Compensation can be in opposition but this is extreme when the conscious attitude has become very one-sided.)</​fc>​ although a knowledge of them would be indispensable for complete adaptation."​\\ <fc red><​sup>​24</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Jung,​ " [[aker:collected_works:​cw3|On the importance of the Unconscious in Psychopathology]],"​ pars. 449ff.</​sub>​\\ §695 "​Normally,​ compensation is an unconscious process, ... In neurosis the unconscious appears in such stark contrast to the conscious state that compensation is disturbed. ​ **//The aim of analytical therapy, therefore, is a realisation of unconscious contents in order that compensation <fc green>​(the process)</​fc>​ may be re-established//​**. "+[[malefic:​igap:​neurosis|Ν]] §693 "means //​balancing//,​ //​adjusting//,​ //​supplementing//​. ​ The concept was introduced into the psychology of the neuroses by Adler.<​fc red><​sup>​20</​sup></​fc>​\\ <fc red><​sup>​20</​sup></​fc><​sub>//​The Neurotic Constitution//​. ​ References to the theory of compensation,​ originally inspired by G. Anton, are also to be found in Gross.</​sub>​\\ \\ <fc green>​Worth reading - the real nugget in the paragraph though I think is not so much the details of Adlers theory that Jung mentions but rather the theme of compensation that Adler highlighted,​ and that it is a process of the '​organism'​ (organs for Adler). ​ This is important as it resonates with Jung's 'self regulating'​ ideas of the psyche as a system and therefore, in this the compensatory aspect in neurosis comes through. ​ As Jung says at the end of the paragraph; </fc> "It corresponds to a similar function in the physiological sphere, namely, the self-regulation of the living organism."​\\ §694 "... I conceive it as functional adjustment in general, an inherent self-regulation of the psychic apparatus.<​fc red><​sup>​24</​sup></​fc> ​ **//In this sense, I regard the activity of the //​[[#​Unconscious|unconscious]]//​ (q.v.) as a balancing of the one-sidedness of the general //​[[#​Attitude|attitude]]//​ (q.v.) produced by the function of //​[[#​Consciousness|consciousness]]//​ (q.v.)//**. ... " ​ <fc green>​Worth reading on.  The para. continues with the discussion of how the tension of opposing attitudes develops and should it become too one sided, then the unconscious content will come through in the form of dreams and //​[[#​Images|images]]//​ as we know.  The theme of enantiodromia is present here.</​fc>​ "As a rule, the unconscious compensation does not run counter to consciousness,​ but is rather a balancing or supplementing of the conscious orientation. ​ **//In dreams, for instance, the unconscious supplies all those contents that are constellated by the conscious situation but are inhibited by conscious selection//​**,​ <fc green>​(See earlier discussion about how the subjective contents determine selection/​direction of the conscious attitude at the exclusion of other content. ​ Compensation can be in opposition but this is extreme when the conscious attitude has become very one-sided.)</​fc>​ although a knowledge of them would be indispensable for complete adaptation."​\\ <fc red><​sup>​24</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Jung,​ " [[collected_works:​cw3|On the importance of the Unconscious in Psychopathology]],"​ pars. 449ff.</​sub>​\\ §695 "​Normally,​ compensation is an unconscious process, ... In neurosis the unconscious appears in such stark contrast to the conscious state that compensation is disturbed. ​ **//The aim of analytical therapy, therefore, is a realisation of unconscious contents in order that compensation <fc green>​(the process)</​fc>​ may be re-established//​**. "
  
 === Concretism === === Concretism ===
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 §745 <fc green>​The image is a</​fc>​ "​homogeneous product with a meaning of its own.  The image is a **//​condensed expression of the psychic situation as a whole//**, of unconscious contents pure and simple."​ <fc green>​Unconscious contents</​fc>​ ..."​that are momentarily constellated. ... Accordingly the image is an expression of the unconscious as well as the conscious situation of the moment. ​ The interpretation of its meaning, therefore, can start neither from the conscious alone nore from the unconscious alone, but only from their reciprocal relationship."​ §745 <fc green>​The image is a</​fc>​ "​homogeneous product with a meaning of its own.  The image is a **//​condensed expression of the psychic situation as a whole//**, of unconscious contents pure and simple."​ <fc green>​Unconscious contents</​fc>​ ..."​that are momentarily constellated. ... Accordingly the image is an expression of the unconscious as well as the conscious situation of the moment. ​ The interpretation of its meaning, therefore, can start neither from the conscious alone nore from the unconscious alone, but only from their reciprocal relationship."​
  
-§746 "I call the image //​primordial//​ when it possesses an //​[[#​Archaic|archaic]]//​ character.<​fc red><​sup>​60</​sup></​fc>​ ... It then expresses material primarily derived from the //​[[#​Unconscious|collective unconscious]]//,​ ..." <fc green>​Read further for //​Collective//​ image vs. //​Personal//​ image.</​fc>​ \\ <fc red><​sup>​60</​sup></​fc><​sub>​A striking example of an archaic image is that of the ssolar phallus, [[aker:collected_works:​cw5|Symbols of Transformation]],​ pars. 151ff.</​sub>​+§746 "I call the image //​primordial//​ when it possesses an //​[[#​Archaic|archaic]]//​ character.<​fc red><​sup>​60</​sup></​fc>​ ... It then expresses material primarily derived from the //​[[#​Unconscious|collective unconscious]]//,​ ..." <fc green>​Read further for //​Collective//​ image vs. //​Personal//​ image.</​fc>​ \\ <fc red><​sup>​60</​sup></​fc><​sub>​A striking example of an archaic image is that of the ssolar phallus, [[collected_works:​cw5|Symbols of Transformation]],​ pars. 151ff.</​sub>​
  
-[[Malefic.MalPaper1|Λ]] §747 "The primordial image, elsewhere also termed archetype,<​fc red><​sup>​61</​sup></​fc>​ is always collective, i.e., it is at least common to entire peoples or epochs. ..." <fc green>I find this comment - and the rest of this paragraph interesting - from the perspective of the unconscious content and the primordial image. ​ I'd have thought it better to say the image should be termed '​archetypal'​ as opposed to termed '​archetype'​. ​ I can see it being archetypal, but as an archetype - these images are potentially going to change if they are common to an epoch. ​ These images being common across cultures as he later goes on to say makes sense too, but then they are //​archetypal//,​ not an archetype. ​ This is interesting to me from the time perspective too, will these images change over time - I think they will.  Will their //​archetypal//​ character (or '​motif'​ as Jung says later) change...no,​ they won't. </fc>+[[aker:​collected_works:​malefic.malpaper1|Λ]] §747 "The primordial image, elsewhere also termed archetype,<​fc red><​sup>​61</​sup></​fc>​ is always collective, i.e., it is at least common to entire peoples or epochs. ..." <fc green>I find this comment - and the rest of this paragraph interesting - from the perspective of the unconscious content and the primordial image. ​ I'd have thought it better to say the image should be termed '​archetypal'​ as opposed to termed '​archetype'​. ​ I can see it being archetypal, but as an archetype - these images are potentially going to change if they are common to an epoch. ​ These images being common across cultures as he later goes on to say makes sense too, but then they are //​archetypal//,​ not an archetype. ​ This is interesting to me from the time perspective too, will these images change over time - I think they will.  Will their //​archetypal//​ character (or '​motif'​ as Jung says later) change...no,​ they won't. </fc>
  
 §748 <fc green>​This paragraph is really tricky to understand - Jung discussing how images, particularly the primordial image, arises. ​ He considers the point from a causal point of view.  The paragraph is tricky to sum up so from a //very basic// point of view :  He starts with the view of [[wp>​Richard//​Semon|Richard Semon]]; that images are mnemic, or engrams resulting from the influence of nature on man.</​fc>​ "From this standpoint it is a psychic expression of the physiological and anatomical disposition. ​ If one holds the view that a particular anatomical structure is a product of environmental conditions working on living matter, then the primordial image, ... would be the product of equally constant and universal influences from without, ..." <fc green>​However,​ Jung asks why solar myths for example do not contain content of the sun but rather the processes appear in allegorised form?  Cf. //​[[#​Constructive|Exegesis diagram]]// above RE Allegory. ​ For Jung this </fc> "​points to an independent collaboration of the psyche, ..." <fc green>​I.e. there is nature and the inherent life, the psyche - or as he puts it, the 'given constitution of the organism.</​fc>​ "​Accordingly,​ the primordial image is related just as much to certain palpable, sel-perpetuating,​ and continually operative natural processes <fc green>​(i.e. nature)</​fc>​ as it is to certain inner determinants of psychic life and of life in general."​\\ ​ §748 <fc green>​This paragraph is really tricky to understand - Jung discussing how images, particularly the primordial image, arises. ​ He considers the point from a causal point of view.  The paragraph is tricky to sum up so from a //very basic// point of view :  He starts with the view of [[wp>​Richard//​Semon|Richard Semon]]; that images are mnemic, or engrams resulting from the influence of nature on man.</​fc>​ "From this standpoint it is a psychic expression of the physiological and anatomical disposition. ​ If one holds the view that a particular anatomical structure is a product of environmental conditions working on living matter, then the primordial image, ... would be the product of equally constant and universal influences from without, ..." <fc green>​However,​ Jung asks why solar myths for example do not contain content of the sun but rather the processes appear in allegorised form?  Cf. //​[[#​Constructive|Exegesis diagram]]// above RE Allegory. ​ For Jung this </fc> "​points to an independent collaboration of the psyche, ..." <fc green>​I.e. there is nature and the inherent life, the psyche - or as he puts it, the 'given constitution of the organism.</​fc>​ "​Accordingly,​ the primordial image is related just as much to certain palpable, sel-perpetuating,​ and continually operative natural processes <fc green>​(i.e. nature)</​fc>​ as it is to certain inner determinants of psychic life and of life in general."​\\ ​
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 === Intellect === === Intellect ===
  
-§766 "I call //​[[#​Thinking|directed thinking]]//​ intellect."​ <fc green>​Cf. [[aker:collected_works:​cw5#​II//​Two//​Kinds//​of//​Thinking//​4//​46|CW 5, paras. 11ff. ]] </fc>+§766 "I call //​[[#​Thinking|directed thinking]]//​ intellect."​ <fc green>​Cf. [[collected_works:​cw5#​II//​Two//​Kinds//​of//​Thinking//​4//​46|CW 5, paras. 11ff. ]] </fc>
  
 === Introjection === === Introjection ===
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 === 53. Thinking === === 53. Thinking ===
  
-§830 "​...one of the four basic psychological //​[[#​Functions|functions]]//​. ​ ... It is an //​[[#​Apperception|apperceptive]]//​ activity, and as such may be divided into //active// and //passive// thinking. ​ Active thinking is an act of //​[[#​Will|will]]//,​ passive thinking is a mer occurrence. ..." <fc green>​(Also,​ Cf. [[aker:collected_works:​cw5#​II//​Two//​Kinds//​of//​Thinking//​1674//​45//​46|CW5]] 'Two kinds of thinking',​ Directed and Symbolic thinking.) ​ This next bit is very interesting:​ </fc> "​Active thinking, accordingly,​ would correspond to my concept of //directed thinking//. <fc red><​sup>​85</​sup></​fc> ​ Passive thinking was inadequately described in my previous work as "​fantasy thinking."<​fc red><​sup>​86</​sup></​fc> ​ Today I would call it //​intuitive//​ thinking."​\\  +§830 "​...one of the four basic psychological //​[[#​Functions|functions]]//​. ​ ... It is an //​[[#​Apperception|apperceptive]]//​ activity, and as such may be divided into //active// and //passive// thinking. ​ Active thinking is an act of //​[[#​Will|will]]//,​ passive thinking is a mer occurrence. ..." <fc green>​(Also,​ Cf. [[collected_works:​cw5#​II//​Two//​Kinds//​of//​Thinking//​1674//​45//​46|CW5]] 'Two kinds of thinking',​ Directed and Symbolic thinking.) ​ This next bit is very interesting:​ </fc> "​Active thinking, accordingly,​ would correspond to my concept of //directed thinking//. <fc red><​sup>​85</​sup></​fc> ​ Passive thinking was inadequately described in my previous work as "​fantasy thinking."<​fc red><​sup>​86</​sup></​fc> ​ Today I would call it //​intuitive//​ thinking."​\\  
-<fc red><​sup>​86</​sup></​fc><​sub>​ [[aker:collected_works:​cw5#​II//​Two//​Kinds//​of//​Thinking//​1674//​45//​46|Ibid.,​ par. 20]]</​sub>​+<fc red><​sup>​86</​sup></​fc><​sub>​ [[collected_works:​cw5#​II//​Two//​Kinds//​of//​Thinking//​1674//​45//​46|Ibid.,​ par. 20]]</​sub>​
  
 §831 <fc green>​Jung clearly relates thinking to judgement, whether intentional or not.  By judgement, he means linking a course of thinking by means of a concept, a concept around which one is focused. ​ He therefore places thinking like '​associative thinking'​ (linking of ideas by association) as 'mere ideation,'​ and not thinking per se. </fc> §831 <fc green>​Jung clearly relates thinking to judgement, whether intentional or not.  By judgement, he means linking a course of thinking by means of a concept, a concept around which one is focused. ​ He therefore places thinking like '​associative thinking'​ (linking of ideas by association) as 'mere ideation,'​ and not thinking per se. </fc>