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 §144 "The basic question for the therapist is not how to get rid of the momentary difficulty, but how future difficulties may be successfully countered. ... and how can it be conveyed to the patient?"​\\ ​ §144 "The basic question for the therapist is not how to get rid of the momentary difficulty, but how future difficulties may be successfully countered. ... and how can it be conveyed to the patient?"​\\ ​
-§145 "The answer obviously consists in getting rid of the separation between conscious and unconscious. ... The tendencies of the conscious and the unconscious are the two factors that together make up the transcendent function. ​ **//It is called "​transcendent"​ because it makes the transition from one attitude to another organically possible, without loss of the unconscious//​**. " <fc green>​(Emphasis mine)  Haha!...the implication here is that the attitude transition occurs from the unconscious the the conscious, making the unconscious attitude the 'right one' :) </fc> "The **//[[aker:collected_works:​cw6#​Constructive|constructive]]//​** or synthetic method of treatment presupposes insights which are at least potentially present in the patient and can therefore be made conscious. ..."+§145 "The answer obviously consists in getting rid of the separation between conscious and unconscious. ... The tendencies of the conscious and the unconscious are the two factors that together make up the transcendent function. ​ **//It is called "​transcendent"​ because it makes the transition from one attitude to another organically possible, without loss of the unconscious//​**. " <fc green>​(Emphasis mine)  Haha!...the implication here is that the attitude transition occurs from the unconscious the the conscious, making the unconscious attitude the 'right one' :) </fc> "The **//​[[collected_works:​cw6#​Constructive|constructive]]//​** or synthetic method of treatment presupposes insights which are at least potentially present in the patient and can therefore be made conscious. ..."
  
-§146 "... the suitably trained analyst mediates the transcendent function for the patient, i.e., helps him to bring conscious and unconscious together and so arrive at a new attitude. ​ In this function of the analyst lies one of the many important meanings of the //​transference//​. ... The understanding of the transference is to be sought not in its historical antecedents <fc green>​(In things like infantile //eros//, sexuality or in a [[aker:collected_works:​cw6#​Concretism|concretistic]]- [[aker:collected_works:​cw6#​Reductive|reductive]] sense.)</​fc>​ but in its purpose. ... " <fc green>​Important to read on further here...understanding of the transference in a //[[aker:collected_works:​cw6#​Constructive|Constructive]]//​ sense.</​fc>​+§146 "... the suitably trained analyst mediates the transcendent function for the patient, i.e., helps him to bring conscious and unconscious together and so arrive at a new attitude. ​ In this function of the analyst lies one of the many important meanings of the //​transference//​. ... The understanding of the transference is to be sought not in its historical antecedents <fc green>​(In things like infantile //eros//, sexuality or in a [[collected_works:​cw6#​Concretism|concretistic]]- [[collected_works:​cw6#​Reductive|reductive]] sense.)</​fc>​ but in its purpose. ... " <fc green>​Important to read on further here...understanding of the transference in a //​[[collected_works:​cw6#​Constructive|Constructive]]//​ sense.</​fc>​
  
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 §203 " ...the more clearly do they reveal their character as //splinter psyches//​."​ §203 " ...the more clearly do they reveal their character as //splinter psyches//​."​
  
-§204 Today we can take it as moderately certain that complexes are in fact "​splinter psyches."​ The aetiology of their origin is frequently a so-called trauma, an emotional shock or some such thing, that splits off a bit of the psyche. Certainly one of the commonest causes is a moral conflict, which ultimately derives from the apparent impossibility of affirming the whole of one's nature. ​ This impossibility presupposes a direct split, no matter whether the conscious mind is aware of it or not." <fc green>​xRef the [[aker:collected_works:​cw8#​on_the_nature_of_the_psyche_343_-_442|'​dissociability'​ of the psyche]]</​fc>​+§204 Today we can take it as moderately certain that complexes are in fact "​splinter psyches."​ The aetiology of their origin is frequently a so-called trauma, an emotional shock or some such thing, that splits off a bit of the psyche. Certainly one of the commonest causes is a moral conflict, which ultimately derives from the apparent impossibility of affirming the whole of one's nature. ​ This impossibility presupposes a direct split, no matter whether the conscious mind is aware of it or not." <fc green>​xRef the [[collected_works:​cw8#​on_the_nature_of_the_psyche_343_-_442|'​dissociability'​ of the psyche]]</​fc>​
  
 §207 "It is not immediately apparent that fear could be the motive which prompts consciousness to explain complexes as its own activity. ... But we are only too ready to make anything unpleasant //unreal// - so long as we possibly can. The outbreak of neurosis signalizes the moment when this can no longer be done by the primitive magical means of apotropaic gestures and euphemisms. From this moment the complex establishes itself on the conscious surface; it can no longer be circumvented and proceeds to assimilate the ego-consciousness step by step, just as, previously, the ego-consciousness tried to assimilate it. This eventually leads to a neurotic dissociation of the personality."​ §207 "It is not immediately apparent that fear could be the motive which prompts consciousness to explain complexes as its own activity. ... But we are only too ready to make anything unpleasant //unreal// - so long as we possibly can. The outbreak of neurosis signalizes the moment when this can no longer be done by the primitive magical means of apotropaic gestures and euphemisms. From this moment the complex establishes itself on the conscious surface; it can no longer be circumvented and proceeds to assimilate the ego-consciousness step by step, just as, previously, the ego-consciousness tried to assimilate it. This eventually leads to a neurotic dissociation of the personality."​
  
-§210 "The universal belief in spirits is a direct expression of the complex structure of the unconscious. Complexes are in truth the living units of the unconscious psyche, and it is only through them that we are able to deduce its existence and its constitution....\\ The //via regia// to the unconscious,​ however, is not the dream, as he <fc green>​(Freud)</​fc>​ thought, but the complex, which is the architect of dreams and of symptoms."​\\ <fc green>​xRef [[aker:collected_works:​cw7|CW7,​ para. 437]]</​fc>​\\ ~~SEARCHPATTERN#'/​(.*§437 \s*([^\n\r]+).*)/​i'??​ +aker:​collected_works:​cw7 _sprender $quote ??~~+§210 "The universal belief in spirits is a direct expression of the complex structure of the unconscious. Complexes are in truth the living units of the unconscious psyche, and it is only through them that we are able to deduce its existence and its constitution....\\ The //via regia// to the unconscious,​ however, is not the dream, as he <fc green>​(Freud)</​fc>​ thought, but the complex, which is the architect of dreams and of symptoms."​\\ <fc green>​xRef [[collected_works:​cw7|CW7,​ para. 437]]</​fc>​\\ ~~SEARCHPATTERN#'/​(.*§437 \s*([^\n\r]+).*)/​i'??​ +aker:​collected_works:​cw7 _sprender $quote ??~~
  
 §213 " ... Herein lies. the unavoidable limitation of psychological observation:​ its validity is contingent upon the personal equation of the observer."​ §213 " ... Herein lies. the unavoidable limitation of psychological observation:​ its validity is contingent upon the personal equation of the observer."​
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 §344 <fc green>​Speaking of the historical precedent in how things were viewed; </​fc>"​Naturally it never occurred to the representatives of the old view that their doctrines were nothing but psychic phenomena, for it was naïvely assumed that with the help of intelligence or reason man could, as it were, climb out of his psychic condition and remove himself to one that was suprapsychic and rational."​ <fc green>I put this quote down as it is important I think to appreciate the view here that Jung is driving home in this para and the previous one; that the experience to then of what man understood about soul and psyche was psychic, it was not objective, but all subjective! ​ Whats more, how can it be any different.</​fc>​\\ ​ §344 <fc green>​Speaking of the historical precedent in how things were viewed; </​fc>"​Naturally it never occurred to the representatives of the old view that their doctrines were nothing but psychic phenomena, for it was naïvely assumed that with the help of intelligence or reason man could, as it were, climb out of his psychic condition and remove himself to one that was suprapsychic and rational."​ <fc green>I put this quote down as it is important I think to appreciate the view here that Jung is driving home in this para and the previous one; that the experience to then of what man understood about soul and psyche was psychic, it was not objective, but all subjective! ​ Whats more, how can it be any different.</​fc>​\\ ​
-<fc green>​Speaking of becoming more conscious; </​fc>"​...for the empirical freedom of the will grows in proportion to the extension of consciousness." ​ <fc green>​Cf. this with the definition of [[aker:collected_works:​cw6#​Will|will]] in CW6.  It is '​disposable energy, or libido available to consciousness.'​ </​fc>​\\ "​...for the empirical freedom of the will grows in proportion to the extension of consciousness."​+<fc green>​Speaking of becoming more conscious; </​fc>"​...for the empirical freedom of the will grows in proportion to the extension of consciousness." ​ <fc green>​Cf. this with the definition of [[collected_works:​cw6#​Will|will]] in CW6.  It is '​disposable energy, or libido available to consciousness.'​ </​fc>​\\ "​...for the empirical freedom of the will grows in proportion to the extension of consciousness."​
  
 §345 "As the individual differentiation of consciousness proceeds, the **objective validity** of its views decreases and their subjectivity increases, at least in the eyes of the environment,​ if not in actual fact." <fc green>​Emphasis mine</​fc>​\\ "​...the seventeenth century ...psychology began to rise up by the side of philosophy, and it was Christian von Wolf (1679-1754) who was the first to speak of "​empirical"​ or "​experimental"​ psychology,<​fc red><​sup>​4</​sup></​fc>​... Psychology had to forgo the philosopher'​s rational definition of truth, because it gradually became clear that no philosophy had sufficient general validity to be uniformly fair to the diversity of individual subjects. <fc green>​(This is important; philosophy as a general collective explanation as presented by the seminal thinkers of their epoch could no longer be applied in a collective sense. ​ As consciousness grew in the 17th century so too did the emancipation from collectiveness. ​ With this came this came the realisation that a psychological perspective is needed.)</​fc>​ ... it naturally became necessary to abandon philosophical argument and to replace it by **experience**. ​ Psychology thereupon turned into a natural science."​ <fc green>​(Emphasis mine.  This is the reason psychology has replaced or at least come alongside philosophy in determining collective and individual perspectives and principles.)</​fc>​ \\ <fc red><​sup>​4</​sup></​fc><​sub>​ //​Psychologia empirica// (1732) </​sub>​ §345 "As the individual differentiation of consciousness proceeds, the **objective validity** of its views decreases and their subjectivity increases, at least in the eyes of the environment,​ if not in actual fact." <fc green>​Emphasis mine</​fc>​\\ "​...the seventeenth century ...psychology began to rise up by the side of philosophy, and it was Christian von Wolf (1679-1754) who was the first to speak of "​empirical"​ or "​experimental"​ psychology,<​fc red><​sup>​4</​sup></​fc>​... Psychology had to forgo the philosopher'​s rational definition of truth, because it gradually became clear that no philosophy had sufficient general validity to be uniformly fair to the diversity of individual subjects. <fc green>​(This is important; philosophy as a general collective explanation as presented by the seminal thinkers of their epoch could no longer be applied in a collective sense. ​ As consciousness grew in the 17th century so too did the emancipation from collectiveness. ​ With this came this came the realisation that a psychological perspective is needed.)</​fc>​ ... it naturally became necessary to abandon philosophical argument and to replace it by **experience**. ​ Psychology thereupon turned into a natural science."​ <fc green>​(Emphasis mine.  This is the reason psychology has replaced or at least come alongside philosophy in determining collective and individual perspectives and principles.)</​fc>​ \\ <fc red><​sup>​4</​sup></​fc><​sub>​ //​Psychologia empirica// (1732) </​sub>​
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 <fc green>​Footnote 23, and xRef footnote 47; Jung mentions William James' comments on the '​discovery'​ of the unconscious in 1886 by Frederic W. H. Myers.</​fc>​ <fc green>​Footnote 23, and xRef footnote 47; Jung mentions William James' comments on the '​discovery'​ of the unconscious in 1886 by Frederic W. H. Myers.</​fc>​
    
-<fc green>​Jung using the word soul here in relation to the unconscious. ​ xRef with his definition of [[aker:collected_works:​cw6#​Soul|soul]] and soul images in CW6. </​fc>​\\ ​+<fc green>​Jung using the word soul here in relation to the unconscious. ​ xRef with his definition of [[collected_works:​cw6#​Soul|soul]] and soul images in CW6. </​fc>​\\ ​
  
 §356 "The hypotheses of the unconscious puts a large question-mark after the idea of the psyche. ​ The soul, as hitherto postulated by the philosophical intellect and equipped with the necessary faculties, threatened to emerge from its chrysalis as something with unexpected and uninvestigated properties. ... So it is with psychology: if the soul is really only an idea, this idea has an alarming air of unpredictability about it - something with qualities no one would ever have imagined."​\\ ​ §356 "The hypotheses of the unconscious puts a large question-mark after the idea of the psyche. ​ The soul, as hitherto postulated by the philosophical intellect and equipped with the necessary faculties, threatened to emerge from its chrysalis as something with unexpected and uninvestigated properties. ... So it is with psychology: if the soul is really only an idea, this idea has an alarming air of unpredictability about it - something with qualities no one would ever have imagined."​\\ ​
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 §367 <fc green>​Jung mentions Psychoid processes. ​ Discussing the senses,</​fc>​ "This analogy makes it conceivable that there is a lower as well as an upper threshold for psychic events, and that consciousness,​ the perceptual system par excellence, may therefore be compared with the perceptible scale of sound or light, having like them a lower and upper limit."​ §367 <fc green>​Jung mentions Psychoid processes. ​ Discussing the senses,</​fc>​ "This analogy makes it conceivable that there is a lower as well as an upper threshold for psychic events, and that consciousness,​ the perceptual system par excellence, may therefore be compared with the perceptible scale of sound or light, having like them a lower and upper limit."​
  
-<fc green>​Using Jung's comparison of our sense organs that have an upper and lower limit like the ear, or the eye - imagine there was a '//​consciousness organ//'​ responsible for perceiving psychic events and able to make them conscious, i.e., heard for sound, or seen for light. ​ The [[aker:​space_and_time|model might look like this]]:</​fc> ​+<fc green>​Using Jung's comparison of our sense organs that have an upper and lower limit like the ear, or the eye - imagine there was a '//​consciousness organ//'​ responsible for perceiving psychic events and able to make them conscious, i.e., heard for sound, or seen for light. ​ The [[:​space_and_time|model might look like this]]:</​fc> ​
  
-{{:aker:time_and_space:​consciousness.png?​800|}}+{{time_and_space:​consciousness.png?​800|}}
  
-<fc green>​The justification for a '​consciousness organ' apart from the ego is that there can be conscious content, i.e., content readily available in a conscious state that ego-consciousness is not aware of.  The discussion of conscious as a '​state'​ could be brought in here. xRef the end of para 369, and [[aker:collected_works:​cw7|CW8,​ para 413]]\\ ​+<fc green>​The justification for a '​consciousness organ' apart from the ego is that there can be conscious content, i.e., content readily available in a conscious state that ego-consciousness is not aware of.  The discussion of conscious as a '​state'​ could be brought in here. xRef the end of para 369, and [[collected_works:​cw7|CW8,​ para 413]]\\ ​
  
 The visible light spectrum with it's upper and lower bounds is shown below.</​fc> ​ The visible light spectrum with it's upper and lower bounds is shown below.</​fc> ​
  
-{{:aker:collected_works:​light.png?​800|}}+{{collected_works:​light.png?​800|}}
  
 §368 "It is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to think of a psychic function as independent of its organ, although in actual fact we experience the psychic process apart from its relation to the organic substrate. ​ For the psychologist,​ however, it is the totality of these experiences that constitutes the object of investigation,​ and for this reason he must abjure a terminology borrowed from the anatomist. ​ If I make use of the term " **//​psychoid//​** "<​fc red><​sup>​34</​sup></​fc>​ I do so with three reservations:​\\ firstly, I use it as an adjective, not as a noun;\\ secondly, no psychic quality ...is implied, ...\\ and thirdly, it is meant to distinguish a category of events from merely vitalistic phenomena on the one hand and from specifically psychic processes on the other."​ §368 "It is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to think of a psychic function as independent of its organ, although in actual fact we experience the psychic process apart from its relation to the organic substrate. ​ For the psychologist,​ however, it is the totality of these experiences that constitutes the object of investigation,​ and for this reason he must abjure a terminology borrowed from the anatomist. ​ If I make use of the term " **//​psychoid//​** "<​fc red><​sup>​34</​sup></​fc>​ I do so with three reservations:​\\ firstly, I use it as an adjective, not as a noun;\\ secondly, no psychic quality ...is implied, ...\\ and thirdly, it is meant to distinguish a category of events from merely vitalistic phenomena on the one hand and from specifically psychic processes on the other."​
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-[[aker:Death|Ω]] §429 "It is, in fact, the coming to consciousness of the psychic process, but it is not, in the deeper sense, an explanation of this process, for no explanation of the psychic can be anything other than the living process of the psyche itself. ​ Psychology is doomed to cancel itself out as a science and therein precisely it reaches its scientific goal." <fc green>I like this quote for the particular bit about the fact that there can be no explanation 'other than the living process of the psyche itself'​ ...this makes me think of the extreme sport examples where the sporting endeavour is itself the symbol - a depiction of the process. </fc>+[[:death|Ω]] §429 "It is, in fact, the coming to consciousness of the psychic process, but it is not, in the deeper sense, an explanation of this process, for no explanation of the psychic can be anything other than the living process of the psyche itself. ​ Psychology is doomed to cancel itself out as a science and therein precisely it reaches its scientific goal." <fc green>I like this quote for the particular bit about the fact that there can be no explanation 'other than the living process of the psyche itself'​ ...this makes me think of the extreme sport examples where the sporting endeavour is itself the symbol - a depiction of the process. </fc>
  
 §465 "Now whether this dream should be considered meaningful or meaningless depends on a very important question, namely, whether the standpoint of morality, handed down through the ages, is itself meaningful or meaningless. I do not wish to wander off into a philosophical discussion of this question, but would merely observe that mankind must obviously have had very strong reasons for devising this morality, for otherwise it would be truly incomprehensible why such restraints should be imposed on one of man's strongest desires. If we give this fact its due, we are bound to pronounce the dream to be meaningful, because it shows the young man the necessity of looking at his erotic conduct for once from the standpoint of morality. Primitive tribes have in some respects extremely strict laws concerning sexuality. This proves that sexual morality is a not-to·be-neglected factor in the higher functions of the psyche and deserves to be taken fully into account. In the case in question we should have to say that the young man, hypnotized by his friends'​ example, has somewhat thoughtlessly given way to his erotic desires, unmindful of the fact that man is a morally responsible being who, voluntarily or involuntarily,​ submits to the morality that he himself has created."​ §465 "Now whether this dream should be considered meaningful or meaningless depends on a very important question, namely, whether the standpoint of morality, handed down through the ages, is itself meaningful or meaningless. I do not wish to wander off into a philosophical discussion of this question, but would merely observe that mankind must obviously have had very strong reasons for devising this morality, for otherwise it would be truly incomprehensible why such restraints should be imposed on one of man's strongest desires. If we give this fact its due, we are bound to pronounce the dream to be meaningful, because it shows the young man the necessity of looking at his erotic conduct for once from the standpoint of morality. Primitive tribes have in some respects extremely strict laws concerning sexuality. This proves that sexual morality is a not-to·be-neglected factor in the higher functions of the psyche and deserves to be taken fully into account. In the case in question we should have to say that the young man, hypnotized by his friends'​ example, has somewhat thoughtlessly given way to his erotic desires, unmindful of the fact that man is a morally responsible being who, voluntarily or involuntarily,​ submits to the morality that he himself has created."​
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 <fc green>​This is very interesting as it speaks to the topic of mythological content appearing in dreams spontaneously,​ without the dreamer having any knowledge of the mythological content. ​ Jung does talk about this elsewhere. ​ The example of the phallus on the sun disk for example in his schizophrenic patient I think it was.  This idea that such an archaic motif and symbol (image) may appear spontaneously from the unconscious without the dreamer having any prior knowledge of such content.</​fc>​ \\  <fc green>​This is very interesting as it speaks to the topic of mythological content appearing in dreams spontaneously,​ without the dreamer having any knowledge of the mythological content. ​ Jung does talk about this elsewhere. ​ The example of the phallus on the sun disk for example in his schizophrenic patient I think it was.  This idea that such an archaic motif and symbol (image) may appear spontaneously from the unconscious without the dreamer having any prior knowledge of such content.</​fc>​ \\ 
-§554 "It is worth noting that the dreamer does not need to have any inkling of the existence of such parallels. This peculiarity is characteristic of dreams of the individuation process, where we find the mythological motifs or mythologems I have designated as archetypes. ​ These are to be understood as specific forms and groups of images which occur not only at all times and in all places but also in individual dreams, fantasies, visions, and delusional ideas. Their frequent appearance in indivi'​dual case material, as well as their universal distribution,​ prove that the human psyche is unique and subjective or personal only in part, and for the rest is collective and objective.<​fc red><​sup>​6</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​6</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Cf. [[aker:collected_works:​cw7|Two Essays on Analytical Psychology]],​ I. chs. V-VII.</​sub>​+§554 "It is worth noting that the dreamer does not need to have any inkling of the existence of such parallels. This peculiarity is characteristic of dreams of the individuation process, where we find the mythological motifs or mythologems I have designated as archetypes. ​ These are to be understood as specific forms and groups of images which occur not only at all times and in all places but also in individual dreams, fantasies, visions, and delusional ideas. Their frequent appearance in indivi'​dual case material, as well as their universal distribution,​ prove that the human psyche is unique and subjective or personal only in part, and for the rest is collective and objective.<​fc red><​sup>​6</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​6</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Cf. [[collected_works:​cw7|Two Essays on Analytical Psychology]],​ I. chs. V-VII.</​sub>​
  
-§555 "​...because it has been overlooked subjectively,​ forces itself objectively upon the dreamer'​s consciousness.<​fc red><​sup>​7</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​7</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Cf. my and C. Kerenyi'​s [[aker:books_and_literature:​essays_on_a_science_of_mythology|Essays on (or Introduction to) a Science of Mythology]]. [Also, [[aker:collected_works:​cw5|Symbols of Transformation]],​ pars. 572ff., 577ff.]</​sub>​+§555 "​...because it has been overlooked subjectively,​ forces itself objectively upon the dreamer'​s consciousness.<​fc red><​sup>​7</​sup></​fc>"​\\ <fc red><​sup>​7</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Cf. my and C. Kerenyi'​s [[books_and_literature:​essays_on_a_science_of_mythology|Essays on (or Introduction to) a Science of Mythology]]. [Also, [[collected_works:​cw5|Symbols of Transformation]],​ pars. 572ff., 577ff.]</​sub>​
  
 §559 the stag §559 the stag
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 §580 "A dream is a psychic product originating in the sleeping state without conscious motivation. In a dream, consciousness is not completely extinguished;​ there is always a small remnant left. In most dreams, for instance, there is still some consciousness of the ego, although it is a very limited and curiously distorted ego known as the dream-ego. It is a mere fragment or shadow of the waking ego. Consciousness exists only when psychic contents are associated with the ego, ... We do not feel as if we were producing the dreams, it is rather as if the dreams came to us. They are not subject to our control but obey their own laws. They are obviously autonomous psychic complexes which form themselves out of their own material."​ §580 "A dream is a psychic product originating in the sleeping state without conscious motivation. In a dream, consciousness is not completely extinguished;​ there is always a small remnant left. In most dreams, for instance, there is still some consciousness of the ego, although it is a very limited and curiously distorted ego known as the dream-ego. It is a mere fragment or shadow of the waking ego. Consciousness exists only when psychic contents are associated with the ego, ... We do not feel as if we were producing the dreams, it is rather as if the dreams came to us. They are not subject to our control but obey their own laws. They are obviously autonomous psychic complexes which form themselves out of their own material."​
  
-§582 "​Common to all three types of phenomena is the fact that the psyche is not an indivisible unity but a divisible and more or less divided whole. Although the separate parts are connected with one another, they are relatively independent,​ so much so that certain parts of the psyche never become associated with the ego at all, or only very rarely. I have called these psychic fragments "​autonomous complexes,"​ and I based my theory of complexes on their existence.<​fc red><​sup>​4</​sup></​fc>​ According to this theory the ego complex forms the centre characteristic of our psyche. But it is only one among several complexes. The others are more often than not associated with the ego-complex and in this way become conscious, but they can also exist for some time without being associated with it. An excellent and very well known example of this is the conversion of St. Paul."​\\ <fc red><​sup>​4</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Cf. supra, "[[aker:collected_works:​cw8#​a_review_of_the_complex_theory|A Review of the Complex Theory.]]"</​sub>​+§582 "​Common to all three types of phenomena is the fact that the psyche is not an indivisible unity but a divisible and more or less divided whole. Although the separate parts are connected with one another, they are relatively independent,​ so much so that certain parts of the psyche never become associated with the ego at all, or only very rarely. I have called these psychic fragments "​autonomous complexes,"​ and I based my theory of complexes on their existence.<​fc red><​sup>​4</​sup></​fc>​ According to this theory the ego complex forms the centre characteristic of our psyche. But it is only one among several complexes. The others are more often than not associated with the ego-complex and in this way become conscious, but they can also exist for some time without being associated with it. An excellent and very well known example of this is the conversion of St. Paul."​\\ <fc red><​sup>​4</​sup></​fc><​sub>​Cf. supra, "​[[collected_works:​cw8#​a_review_of_the_complex_theory|A Review of the Complex Theory.]]"</​sub>​
  
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