The psychological Meaning of Redemption Motifs in Fairytales

Reference
von Franz, Marie-Louise (1980) The psychological Meaning of Redemption Motifs in Fairytales. Inner City Books.

to do p27 “ the hermaphrodite

p38 “People swing between resigned depression on one side and the bringing out of enormous claims on the other. This is typical of the nigredo of the alchemists, with the symbols of black mists and ravens flying about and, the alchemists say, “all wild animals walking past.”

p39 “If you dreamt that not you yourself but another figure had been turned into an animal, the hypothesis would be that the ego complex had been overwhelmed by another complex. Let us assume that a man dreams that a woman he loves, his anima figure, is turned into a black dog; that is, the anima, which should have a human field of experience, a human expression (the inner life which has reached a human level), has been overwhelmed by a drive, has regressed into a pre-human form of expression through the influence of inner complexes.”

to do p84 ” the Self as a self-renewing system.

Speaking here about the Seven Ravens Grimm fairytale, she references CW12 §201 where Jung speaks of the difficulty in assimilating the fourth function, going from 3 to 4 in a dream.
p108 “At the end of both fairytales you have eight persons. The symbolism of this motif is discussed by Jung in Psychology and Alchemy, where the difficult step from three to four, or seven to eight, is related to the problem of integration the fourth, inferior function. Here there is always a great difficulty, which has to do with the fact that the unconscious cannot be completely integrated and the fourth function always remains more or less autonomous. This is actually a good thing, for it means that the flow of life goes on and always constellates new material and new problems. The whole is never integrated, and supposing it could be, it would mean the petrification of the life process.”

and Cf.

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